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The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI): the Case of the Chinese Provinces during the Economic Transition


  • Mario Biggeri

    () (Università degli Studi di Firenze)


Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is considered a relevant factor of Chinese economic growth particularly for the coastal region. The aim of this paper is to understand what determined the location of FDI in China during the economic transition from the early 1980’s up to the Asian crisis. In order to examine which factors affected the amount of FDI received by the provinces an empirical analysis based is carried out. The estimates are obtained through a panel analysis utilising a panel data set at provincial level. The empirical findings emphasise that in addition to factors usually considered in the literature -such as market access, market profitability, strategic location, production costs, factor endowments, agglomeration effect, policy promotion, political stability, etc. …- a higher FDI inflow is determined also by the level of institutional changes towards marketisation.

Suggested Citation

  • Mario Biggeri, 2012. "The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI): the Case of the Chinese Provinces during the Economic Transition," Working Papers 1211, c.MET-05 - Centro Interuniversitario di Economia Applicata alle Politiche per L'industria, lo Sviluppo locale e l'Internazionalizzazione.
  • Handle: RePEc:cme:wpaper:1211

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Chunlai Chen, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment in China," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14100.
    6. Fuss, Melvyn & McFadden, Daniel & Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "A Survey of Functional Forms in the Economic Analysis of Production," Histoy of Economic Thought Chapters,in: Fuss, Melvyn & McFadden, Daniel (ed.), Production Economics: A Dual Approach to Theory and Applications, volume 1, chapter 4 McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought.
    7. Cheng, Leonard K. & Kwan, Yum K., 2000. "What are the determinants of the location of foreign direct investment? The Chinese experience," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 379-400, August.
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    12. Yuanzheng Cao & Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1999. "From federalism, Chinese style to privatization, Chinese style," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 103-131, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mauricio Zelaya & Ayse Yüce, 2014. "Foreign Direct Investment Decisions into China and India," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(3), pages 300-316, March.

    More about this item


    Foreign direct investment; China; Economics of transition;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies


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