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Trade liberalization, production organization and informal sector of the developing countries


  • Dibyendu Maiti
  • Sugata Marjit


The paper provides an explanation of recent empirical evidence on fragmentation and the expansion of the informal sector in India. We argue that as the prospect of getting a better price in the international market increases, the producers in the formal sector act more like merchants and subcontract production activities to the producers in the informal sectors. Expanding production in the informal sector allows the firm to take advantage of a growing export market. Our theoretical model explains such organizational change in terms of allocation of monitoring effort between marketing and production. The existence of a low-wage informal sector facilitates division of labor and specialization in the formal segment.

Suggested Citation

  • Dibyendu Maiti & Sugata Marjit, 2008. "Trade liberalization, production organization and informal sector of the developing countries," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 453-461.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:17:y:2008:i:3:p:453-461 DOI: 10.1080/09638190802137125

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Bond, Eric W. & Chen, Tain-Jy, 1987. "The welfare effects of illegal immigration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 315-328, November.
    9. Rodrik, Rani, 1995. "Trade and industrial policy reform," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 45, pages 2925-2982 Elsevier.
    10. Panagariya, Arvind & Schiff, Maurice, 1994. "Can revenue maximizing export taxes yield higher welfare than welfare maximizing export taxes?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 79-84, May.
    11. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu, 1996. "Growth, welfare and optimal trade taxes: a fallacy of composition," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 369-380, August.
    12. Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Peri, Giovanni, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the US," CEPR Discussion Papers 5226, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Christian Dustmann & Arthur Van Soest, 2002. "Language and the Earnings of Immigrants," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(3), pages 473-492, April.
    15. Wilson, John Douglas, 1999. "Theories of Tax Competition," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 52(n. 2), pages 269-304, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dibyendu S. Maiti & Arup Mitra, 2010. "Skills, Informality and Development," Working Papers id:3115, eSocialSciences.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:137:y:2017:i:c:p:90-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Roychowdhury, Punarjit & Dutta, Mousumi, 2011. "Regulation, governance and informality: an empirical analysis of selected countries," MPRA Paper 33775, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Dibyendu Maiti & Sugata Marjit, 2011. "Subcontracting, R&D And Labour Productivity: A Theoretical Explanation," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 36(3), pages 1-24, September.
    5. Marjit, Sugata & Kar, Saibal & Chaudhuri, Sarbajit, 2011. "Recession in the skilled sector and implications for informal wage," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 158-163, September.


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