IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Skills, Informality and Development

  • Dibyendu S. Maiti


  • Arup Mitra


This paper makes an attempt to estimate the index of informal sector employment which can be attributed to the supply-push phenomenon. Factors which explain the inter-state variations include the industrial-informal sector wage gap, revenue expenditure, and development expenditure incurred by the government. Increased development expenditure brings in a decline in distress-led informalization. With improved education, health, and infrastructure facilities the employability of an individual goes up, which, in turn, reduces the compulsion to get absorbed residually. However, expansion in government activities measured through increased revenue expenditure raises in-migration, which in turn raises the supply-push phenomenon. We also observed that with an increase in distress-led informalization inequality tends to rise. Adoption of labour intensive technology in the organized industrial sector is indeed crucial for pro-poor growth. The other policy implication is in terms of enhanced investment in the areas of education, health and other infrastructural facilities.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:3115.

in new window

Date of creation: Nov 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3115
Note: Conference Papers
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Marjit, Sugata & Ghosh, Sudeep & Biswas, Amit, 2007. "Informality, corruption and trade reform," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 777-789, September.
  2. Pinelopi K. Goldberg & Nina Pavcnik, 2003. "The Response of the Informal Sector to Trade Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 9443, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Dibyendu Maiti & Sugata Marjit, 2008. "Trade liberalization, production organization and informal sector of the developing countries," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 453-461.
  4. Marjit, Sugata, 2003. "Economic reform and informal wage--a general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 371-378, October.
  5. Dilip Mookherjee & Stefan Napel & Debraj Ray, 2010. "Aspirations, Segregation, and Occupational Choice," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 139-168, 03.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3115. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.