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Is economics a good major for future lawyers? Evidence from earnings data

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  • John V. Winters

Abstract

This study reports descriptive data on earnings differences for practicing lawyers by undergraduate major with a focus on economics majors. Some majors do much better than others. Economics majors tend to do very well in both median and mean earnings. Electrical engineering, accounting, finance, and some other majors also do relatively well. This information is useful for undergraduates planning to attend law school and considering what undergraduate major field to study. Economics appears to be a very good option.

Suggested Citation

  • John V. Winters, 2016. "Is economics a good major for future lawyers? Evidence from earnings data," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 187-191, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:47:y:2016:i:2:p:187-191
    DOI: 10.1080/00220485.2016.1146101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Nieswiadomy, 2010. "LSAT® Scores of Economics Majors: The 2008--9 Class Update," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 331-333, June.
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    4. Michael Nieswiadomy, 2014. "LSAT® Scores of Economics Majors: The 2012--13 Class Update," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1), pages 71-74, March.
    5. Michael Nieswiadomy, 1998. "LSAT Scores of Economics Majors," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 377-379, January.
    6. Thomas Carroll & Djeto Assane & Jared Busker, 2014. "Why it Pays to Major in Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 251-261, September.
    7. Michael Nieswiadomy, 2006. "LSAT Scores of Economics Majors: The 2003-2004 Class Update," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 244-247, April.
    8. Sam Allgood & William Bosshardt & Wilbert Van Der Klaauw & Michael Watts, 2011. "Economics Coursework And Long‐Term Behavior And Experiences Of College Graduates In Labor Markets And Personal Finance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(3), pages 771-794, July.
    9. R. Kim Craft & Joe G. Baker, 2003. "Do Economists Make Better Lawyers? Undergraduate Degree Field and Lawyer Earnings," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 263-281, January.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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