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Why are Informal Loans Still a Big Deal? Evidence from North-east Thailand

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  • Carmen Kislat

Abstract

This article examines the use and benefit of informal loans for different income groups of rural households in north-east Thailand. Using a difference-in-differences estimation approach, which is later complemented by propensity score matching, the article shows that different household groups profit from informal loans in different ways. Poor households increase their asset endowment, and in particular farming assets, whereas rich households' (food) consumption rises, especially if households borrow due to a shock. By showing that informal loans serve different households for different purposes, this article provides an explanation why they still play an important role.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Kislat, 2015. "Why are Informal Loans Still a Big Deal? Evidence from North-east Thailand," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(5), pages 569-585, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:51:y:2015:i:5:p:569-585
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2014.983907
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo & Rachel Glennerster & Cynthia Kinnan, 2015. "The Miracle of Microfinance? Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 22-53, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thanh-Tung Nguyen & Trung Thanh Nguyen & Ulrike Grote, 2020. "Credit and Ethnic Consumption Inequality in the Central Highlands of Vietnam," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 148(1), pages 143-172, February.
    2. Thanh-Tung Nguyen & Trung Thanh Nguyen & Ulrike Grote, 2020. "Weather shocks, credit and production efficiency of rice farmers in Vietnam," TVSEP Working Papers wp-017, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics, Project TVSEP.
    3. Carolina Laureti, 2017. "Why do Poor People Co-hold Debt and Liquid Savings?," Working Papers CEB 17-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Marcello Pagnini & Paola Rossi & Valerio Vacca & Carmen Kislat & Lukas Menkhoff & Doris Neuberger, 2017. "Credit Market Structure and Collateral in Rural Thailand," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 46(3), pages 587-632, November.

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