IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/ecsysr/v16y2004i4p367-390.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Food-For-Work versus Cash-For-Work: Emergency Assistance in Palestine

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Missaglia
  • Paul de Boer

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the provision of emergency assistance (food assistance, cash transfers, employment programmes, etc) to a country whose economy has been decimated since the start of the second intifada. We try to simulate the different potential effects brought about by these different policies and, in particular, to draw some policy implications concerning the Food-for-Work versus Cash-for-Work debate. To that end we have constructed a general equilibrium model of the Palestinian economy that we calibrate on the (pre-intifada) Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) of 1998. We give a so-called 'intifada-shock' to construct a counterfactual 'post-intifada' SAM which serves as basis for our policy simulations. We show that monetary aid from abroad is to be preferred to food aid from abroad. We argue that a labour-oriented approach (subsidizing the most labour-intensive sectors) is to be preferred to a welfare-oriented approach where the subsidized sectors produce those goods that dominate the consumption basket.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Missaglia & Paul de Boer, 2004. "Food-For-Work versus Cash-For-Work: Emergency Assistance in Palestine," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 367-390.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:16:y:2004:i:4:p:367-390 DOI: 10.1080/0953531042000304254
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0953531042000304254
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. William Easterly, 2002. "The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550423, January.
    2. Basu, Kaushik, 1996. "Relief programs: When it may be better to give food instead of cash," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 91-96, January.
    3. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 126-142.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Botta, Alberto, 2010. "The Palestinian economy and its trade pattern: Stylised facts and alternative modelling strategies," MPRA Paper 29719, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. de Boer, P.M.C., 2008. "Lack of peaceful resolution with Israel: economic cost for Palestinians," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2008-23, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    3. Paul de Boer & Marco Missaglia, 2006. "Economic consequences of intifada," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 97-106.
    4. de Boer, P.M.C. & Missaglia, M., 2005. "Introducing the indirect addilog system in a computable general equilibrium model: a case study for Palestine," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2005-25, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    5. de Boer, P.M.C., 2009. "Modeling household behavior in a CGE model: linear expenditure system or indirect addilog?," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2009-16, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    6. de Boer, P.M.C. & Missaglia, M., 2007. "Economic consequences of intifada: a sequel," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2007-39, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    7. de Boer, P.M.C. & Missaglia, M., 2006. "Estimation of income elasticities and their use in a CGE model in Palestine," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2006-12, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    8. Missaglia, Marco & Valensisi, Giovanni, 2014. "Trade policy in Palestine: A reassessment," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 899-923.
    9. Paul de Boer, 2010. "Modeling Household Behavior in a CGE Model: Linear Expenditure System or Indirect Addilog?," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_059, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:16:y:2004:i:4:p:367-390. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CESR20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.