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The determinants of investment in information and communication technologies

  • P. Guerrieri
  • M. Luciani
  • V. Meliciani

In this paper, we assess the determinants of information and communication technology (ICT) investment at the macro-level, for a panel of 10 advanced countries, in the period 1992-2005. We investigate the idea that, since ICTs are general purpose technologies, the decision to invest in these technologies is strongly affected by the general business environment in which the investment takes place. The empirical results are consistent with this idea: facilitating factors such as changes in market regulation, amount of human capital, expenditure on R&D, and the share of the dynamic services sector in the economy, positively influence investment in ICT.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10438599.2010.526313
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

Volume (Year): 20 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 387-403

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:20:y:2011:i:4:p:387-403
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  1. Stefanie Haller & Iulia Traistaru-Siedschlag, 2007. "The Adoption of ICT: Firm-Level Evidence from Irish Manufacturing Industries," Papers WP204, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  2. Guerrieri, Paolo & Meliciani, Valentina, 2005. "Technology and international competitiveness: The interdependence between manufacturing and producer services," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 489-502, December.
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  12. Hollenstein, Heinz, 2004. "Determinants of the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT): An empirical analysis based on firm-level data for the Swiss business sector," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 315-342, September.
  13. Trinh Le & John Gibson & Les Oxley, 2005. "Measures of human capital: A review of the literature," Treasury Working Paper Series 05/10, New Zealand Treasury.
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