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Determinants of adoption of flexible production technologies: Evidence from portuguese manufacturing industry

  • Ana Faria
  • Paul Fenn
  • Alistair Bruce

This paper investigates the main determinants of adoption of flexible production technologies (FPTs), using a cross-section of Portuguese manufacturing firms. In order to investigate the determinants of adoption by Portuguese firms we estimate a probit model of technology adoption, where rank, location, industry and demand uncertainty effects are considered. The main findings are that: (i) plant heterogeneity is important in understanding differences in the likelihood of adoption; (ii) spillover effects resulting from geographical proximity foster adoption; (iii) differences in technological regimes across industries also play a role in the diffusion process; and (iv) demand uncertainty increases the likelihood of adoption of FPTs.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10438590214338
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

Volume (Year): 11 (2002)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 569-580

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:11:y:2002:i:6:p:569-580
DOI: 10.1080/10438590214338
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  1. Roller, Lars-Hendrik & Tombak, Mihkel M., 1991. "Strategic aspects of flexible production technologies: theory and evidence," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1-3), pages 197-204, October.
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  8. Baptista, Rui & Swann, Peter, 1998. "Do firms in clusters innovate more?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 525-540, September.
  9. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1985. "Preemption and Rent Equalization in the Adoption of New Technology," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(3), pages 383-401.
  10. Edwin Mansfield & John Rapoport & Anthony Romeo & Samuel Wagner & George Beardsley, 1977. "Social and Private Rates of Return from Industrial Innovations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(2), pages 221-240.
  11. Paul Stoneman & Otto Toivanen, 1997. "The Diffusion Of Multiple Technologies: An Empirical Study," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 1-17.
  12. Ghosal, Vivek, 1991. "Demand Uncertainty and the Capital-Labor Ratio: Evidence from the U.S. Manufacturing Sector," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 157-61, February.
  13. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1990. "The Economics of Modern Manufacturing: Technology, Strategy, and Organization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 511-28, June.
  14. Romeo, Anthony A, 1975. "Interindustry and Interfirm Differences in the Rate of Diffusion of an Innovation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 311-19, August.
  15. Stoneman, Paul & Kwon, Myung-Joong, 1994. "The Diffusion of Multiple Process Technologies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 420-31, March.
  16. Romeo, Anthony A, 1977. "The Rate of Imitation of a Capital-Embodied Process Innovation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 44(173), pages 63-69, February.
  17. Colombo, Massimo G & Mosconi, Rocco, 1995. "Complementarity and Cumulative Learning Effects in the Early Diffusion of Multiple Technologies," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 13-48, March.
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