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A Random Rationing Mechanism Which Reduces The Risks Of No Son Left At Home


  • Shu-Yi Liao
  • Yu-Ying Lin
  • Wei-Chun Tseng


Lotteries can be used to meet shortages in military-manpower-demanding situations before and during a large-scale war. By developing a new lottery mechanism that is fair in that everyone has the same success rate, the approach adopted in this paper is able to outperform the traditional lottery by generating extra rents in such a way that brothers or similar close family members can choose to maximize the chance that at least one person stays home, thereby reducing social cost. We use 2010 data for three war hot zones - namely, South Korea, Colombia and Taiwan - as examples.

Suggested Citation

  • Shu-Yi Liao & Yu-Ying Lin & Wei-Chun Tseng, 2011. "A Random Rationing Mechanism Which Reduces The Risks Of No Son Left At Home," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 265-277.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:22:y:2011:i:3:p:265-277 DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2010.491686

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    References listed on IDEAS

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