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The Effect Of 9/11 On Us Exports And Imports Of Tourism


  • Alan King


Several studies have investigated whether the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, have had an ongoing or merely transitory effect on US trade in tourism. All conclude in favor of the latter. However, limitations in either the data and/or methodology employed by these studies give cause to query their findings. The present study avoids these limitations and finds strong evidence that, once other factors are held constant, real US exports and imports of tourism have both remained significantly below their pre-2001 level.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan King, 2010. "The Effect Of 9/11 On Us Exports And Imports Of Tourism," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5-6), pages 535-546.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:21:y:2010:i:5-6:p:535-546 DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2010.528253

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cointegration; Exports; Imports; Terrorism; Tourism;


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