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Participation in marijuana, cocaine and heroin consumption in Australia: a multivariate probit approach

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  • Preety Ramful
  • Xueyan Zhao

Abstract

This article investigates factors affecting the participation in marijuana, cocaine and heroin using micro-unit data from an Australian national survey on recreational drugs. Accounting for cross-drug correlation potentially induced by unobserved personal characteristics such as individual tastes and addictive personalities, we estimate a trivariate probit model, where the participation decisions are jointly modelled as a system with correlated error terms. The estimated correlation coefficients are significant across all three drugs. The study provides valuable empirical information on conditional and joint probabilities of drug participation. The multivariate approach is shown to provide better analysis relative to a univariate approach that does not address the endogeneity of all drug participation variables.

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  • Preety Ramful & Xueyan Zhao, 2009. "Participation in marijuana, cocaine and heroin consumption in Australia: a multivariate probit approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 481-496.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:4:p:481-496
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701522853
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    Cited by:

    1. Craig A. Gallet, 2014. "Can Price Get The Monkey Off Our Back? A Meta‐Analysis Of Illicit Drug Demand," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 55-68, January.
    2. Sarah Brown & Mark N. Harris & Jake Prendergast & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Pharmaceutical drug misuse: are industry of employment and occupation risk factors?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(5-6), pages 398-417, November.
    3. Sarah Brown & Mark N Harris & Jake Prendergast & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Pharmaceutical Drug Misuse, Industry of Employment and Occupation," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1501, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Carlos Casacuberta & Mariana Gerstenblüth & Patricia Triunfo, 2012. "Aportes del análisis económico al estudio de las drogas," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0112, Department of Economics - dECON.
    5. William H Greene & Mark N Harris & Preety Srivastava & Xueyan Zhao, 2013. "Econometric Modelling of Social Bads," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1305, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    6. Preety Ramful & Xueyan Zhao, 2008. "Individual Heterogeneity in Alcohol Consumption: The Case of Beer, Wine and Spirits in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(265), pages 207-222, June.
    7. Hassen, Sied, 2018. "The effect of farmyard manure on the continued and discontinued use of inorganic fertilizer in Ethiopia: An ordered probit analysis," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 523-532.
    8. Lu, Qinan & Du, Xiaodong, 2020. "The Outsourcing Choice of Agricultural Production Tasks: Implications for Food Security - A Multiple-task Based Approach," 2020 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, Kansas City, Missouri 304333, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Sarah Brown & Mark N Harris & Preety Srivastava, 2013. "Modelling Illegal Drug Participation in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1303, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    10. William Greene & Mark N. Harris & Preety Srivastava & Xueyan Zhao, 2018. "Misreporting and econometric modelling of zeros in survey data on social bads: An application to cannabis consumption," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 372-389, February.

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