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Self-employment in the UK regions


  • Martin Robson


The significant regional variations which exist in the rate of self-employment among UK males are highlighted and attempts made to explain them. Using pooled crosssection time-series data for the period 1973 - 93, it is found that in the long run, regional rates of self-employmentare a function of the real value of net housing wealth and the industry composition of regional GDP. However, a significant proportion of regional variations in self-employment can only be explained by regional 'fixed effects', which reflect fundamental long-term influences which make some regions more fertile environments for self-employment than others.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Robson, 1998. "Self-employment in the UK regions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 313-322.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:3:p:313-322
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498325831

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Erik Monsen & Prashanth Mahagaonkar & Christian Dienes, 2012. "Entrepreneurship in India: the question of occupational transition," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 359-382, September.
    2. Darja Reuschke, 2011. "Self-Employment and Geographical Mobility in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 417, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Blanchflower, David G., 2000. "Self-employment in OECD countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(5), pages 471-505, September.
    4. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0814-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Alexander Konon & Michael Fritsch & Alexander Kritikos, 2017. "Business Cycles and Start-ups across Industries: an Empirical Analysis for Germany," Jena Economic Research Papers 2017-013, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    6. Faggian, Alessandra & Partridge, Mark & Malecki, Ed, 2016. "Creating an environment for economic growth: creativity, entrepreneurship or human capital?," MPRA Paper 71445, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Audretsch, David B. & Bönte, Werner & Tamvada, Jagannadha Pawan, 2013. "Religion, social class, and entrepreneurial choice," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 774-789.
    8. Evguenii Zazdravnykh, 2014. "Why there are more entrepreneurs-manufacturers in one regions and less in others: an empirical evidence," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(3), pages 140-146.

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