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Testing for the rational addiction hypothesis in Spanish tobacco consumption


  • Jose Julian Escario
  • Jose Alberto Molina


This paper tests whether tobacco consumption generates addiction in Spanish people and, if so, then whether such addiction can be explained in the context of rational addiction theory. To that end, time-series data of per-capita consumption and prices of tobacco during the period 1964 to 1995 are employed. The results show the addictive and rational character of Spanish tobacco consumption, which implies that smokers fall into addiction after a maximization process of the utility that was obtained during their total lifetime, taking into account the future consequences of current decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Julian Escario & Jose Alberto Molina, 2001. "Testing for the rational addiction hypothesis in Spanish tobacco consumption," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 211-215.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:8:y:2001:i:4:p:211-215 DOI: 10.1080/135048501750103854

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Alan Speight & David McMillan, 1997. "Are there asymmetries in UK consumption? A closer look," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 241-245.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlo Ciccarelli & Pierpaolo Pierani & Silvia Tiezzi, 2014. "Secular trends in tobacco consumption: the case of Italy, 1871-2010," Department of Economics University of Siena 700, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    2. Silvia TIEZZI, "undated". "Addiction and Smoking Behaviour in Italy," EcoMod2004 330600141, EcoMod.
    3. Ciccarelli, Carlo & Giamboni, Luigi & Waldmann, Robert, 2007. "Cigarette smoking, pregnancy, forward looking behavior and dynamic inconsistency," MPRA Paper 8878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ferrando-Latorre, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption and intergenerational mobility: a research program in a family context," MPRA Paper 79777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Silvia Tiezzi, 2005. "An empirical analysis of tobacco addiction in Italy," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 6(3), pages 233-243, September.
    6. Campaña, Juan Carlos, 2017. "¿Pueden llegar a ser adictivos los comportamientos juveniles sedentarios en el hogar? Un programa de investigación con respuestas conceptuales y evidencia empírica
      [Can sedentary youth behaviors be
      ," MPRA Paper 81401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Escario, Jose Julian & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2004. "Modeling the optimal fiscal policy on tobacco consumption," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 81-93, January.
    8. Thomas Demuynck & Ewout Verriest, 2013. "I’Ll Never Forget My First Cigarette: A Revealed Preference Analysis Of The “Habits As Durables” Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54(2), pages 717-738, May.
    9. Martyn Duffy, 2006. "Tobacco consumption and policy in the United Kingdom," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(11), pages 1235-1257.
    10. Joan Costa-Font & Joan Rovira, 2005. "When do smokers 'underestimate' smoking related mortality risks?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(13), pages 789-794.
    11. Pierpaolo Pierani & Silvia Tiezzi, 2009. "Addiction and interaction between alcohol and tobacco consumption," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 1-23, September.
    12. Ferrando, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption among adolescents: A survey for Spain," MPRA Paper 79465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Silvia Tiezzi, 2003. "Addiction and Smoking Behaviour in Italy," Department of Economics University of Siena 412, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    14. Junmin Wan, 2004. "Cigarette Tax Revenues and Tobacco Control in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 04-11-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Feb 2006.

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