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Rational Addiction Evidence From Carbonated Soft Drinks

  • Xiaoou, Liu
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    This paper applies the Becker-Murphy (1988) theory of rational addiction to the case of carbonated soft drinks, using a time-varying parameter model and scanner data from 46 U.S. cities. Empirical results provide strong evidence that carbonated soft drinks are rationally addictive, thus opening the door to taxation and regulation. Taking rational addition into account, estimated demand elasticities are much lower than previous estimates using scanner data.

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    Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China with number 51620.

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    Date of creation: 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:51620
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    1. Zheng, Yuqing & Kaiser, Harry M., 2008. "Estimating Asymmetric Advertising Response: An Application to U.S. Nonalcoholic Beverage Demand," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(03), December.
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    12. Michael Grossman & Frank J. Chaloupka & Ismail Sirtalan, 1995. "An Empirical Analysis of Alcohol Addiction: Results from the Monitoring the Future Panels," NBER Working Papers 5200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Bentzen, J. & Eriksson, T. & Smith, V., 1997. "Rational Addiction and Alcohol Consumption: Evidence from the Nordic Countries," Papers 97-16, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
    14. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1986. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 41, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    15. Michael Grossman & Frank J. Chaloupka & Charles C. Brown, 1996. "The Demand for Cocaine by Young Adults: A Rational Addiction Approach," NBER Working Papers 5713, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    17. Badi H. Baltagi & James M. Griffin, 2002. "Rational addiction to alcohol: panel data analysis of liquor consumption," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 485-491.
    18. Steven T. Yen & Biing-Hwan Lin & David M. Smallwood & Margaret Andrews, 2004. "Demand for nonalcoholic beverages: The case of low-income households," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 309-321.
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