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Structural breaks and stochastic trends in macroeconomic variables in Norway


  • Hilde Christiane Bjørnland


This paper analyses the dynamic properties of several macroeconomic variables in Norway, using different unit root tests and measures of persistence. For none of the variables can we reject the hypothesis of a unit root in favour of a deterministic linear trend alternative. However, when allowing for a structural break in the trend alternative, we can reject the hypothesis of a unit root for unemployment, government consumption, investment and real wage. Most of the Norwegian time series display little persistence. However, for those series that show a high degree of persistence, adjusting for the break in the trend, persistence falls considerably.

Suggested Citation

  • Hilde Christiane Bjørnland, 1999. "Structural breaks and stochastic trends in macroeconomic variables in Norway," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 133-138.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:6:y:1999:i:3:p:133-138 DOI: 10.1080/135048599353483

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Kaldor, Nicholas, 1970. "The Case for Regional Policies," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 17(3), pages 337-348, November.
    7. Helmut Hofer & Andreas Worgotter, 1997. "Regional Per Capita Income Convergence in Austria," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 1-12.
    8. Gudgin, Graham, 1995. "Regional Problems and Policy in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 18-63, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. ALTINAY, Galip, 2005. "Structural Breaks in Long-Term Turkish Macroeconomic Data,1923-2003," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(4).
    2. Romero-Ávila, Diego, 2009. "Are OECD consumption-income ratios stationary after all?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 107-117, January.

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