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Measuring the under-diversification of socially responsible investments

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  • Fabio Pizzutilo

Abstract

This article proposes a straightforward measure of the residual unsystematic risk that a selective portfolio investment strategy, such as socially responsible investment, eventually bears. The model is empirically employed in order to analyse whether the MSCI socially responsible indices bear significant levels of volatility that could be diversified by not imposing social screenings to the set of eligible investments. The study finds that a low but not negligible part of the volatility of the returns could be diversified by not restricting the investment to socially responsible companies. Implications for the socially responsible investing industry and socially responsible investors are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Pizzutilo, 2017. "Measuring the under-diversification of socially responsible investments," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(14), pages 1005-1018, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:24:y:2017:i:14:p:1005-1018
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2016.1248279
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    Cited by:

    1. Arnaud Gougler & Sebastian Utz, 2020. "Factor exposures and diversification: Are sustainably screened portfolios any different?," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 34(3), pages 221-249, September.

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