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Fiscal policy sustainability: test of intertemporal borrowing constraints

  • Huseyin Kalyoncu

This paper examines sustainability of the fiscal stances of South Korea, Mexico, the Philippines, South Africa and Turkey. Using the usual intertemporal borrowing constraint, we have tested for a long-run relationship between revenue and expenditure plus interest payments. In our empirical analysis of the sustainability of fiscal stances, cointegration approaches have been used. Empirical results suggest that there exists a unique long-run or equilibrium relationship among variables for South Korea and Turkey. The cointegration results suggest that the Turkish and South Korean fiscal stances satisfy the weak sustainability condition. In the case of Mexico, the Philippines and South Africa cointegration results suggest that in these countries the fiscal stance is not sustainable (and violates their intertemporal budget constraints) in the long run.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 12 (2005)
Issue (Month): 15 ()
Pages: 957-962

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:12:y:2005:i:15:p:957-962
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  1. Michael Artis & Massimiliano Marcellino, . "Fiscal Solvency and Fiscal Forecasting in Europe," Working Papers 142, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  2. Ahmed, S. & Rogers, J.H., 1993. "Government Budget Deficits and Trade Deficits: Are Present Value Constraints Satisfied in Long-Term Data?," Papers 5-93-6, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
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