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The changing food expenditure patterns and trends in Zambia: implications for agricultural policies

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  • Brian Chisanga

    (Indaba Agricultural Policy Research Institute)

  • Olipa Zulu-Mbata

    (Indaba Agricultural Policy Research Institute)

Abstract

Zambia, like many other African countries is undergoing rapid urbanization and rising per capita income, accompanied by rising population. This study sought to understand the changing food expenditure patterns in Zambia and the implications of this transformation on food policy, food market development, and rural development. The main source of data for the study was the Living Conditions Monitoring Survey (LCMS) data collected in 1996, 1998, 2010, and 2015 by the Central Statistical Office (CSO) of Zambia. Trends in expenditure shares were done for each of the food categories over time and by rural and urban areas. The study found that there have been major declines in the shares of food expenditure on maize among rural and urban households between 1996 and 2015. However, wheat shares in urban households’ diets increased while rural households experienced a drop in coarse grains and tubers. Wealthier households spent larger shares of their food expenditure on wheat, rice and potatoes. Further, wealthier households increased their share of expenditure on animal protein, while poorer households doubled their expenditure on vegetables. Thus, transformation of food expenditure patterns is evident mostly among the high income households, mainly in urban areas. Overall the changing pattern of food expenditure is consistent with rising incomes and rapid urbanization. However, the disparities between the different income groups and between rural and urban areas are indicative of a rise in income inequality both in urban and rural parts of Zambia.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Chisanga & Olipa Zulu-Mbata, 2018. "The changing food expenditure patterns and trends in Zambia: implications for agricultural policies," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 721-740, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0810-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-018-0810-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ibrahim Hassen Worku & Mekdim Dereje & Bart Minten & Kalle Hirvonen, 2017. "Diet transformation in Africa: the case of Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 48(S1), pages 73-86, November.
    2. Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Huang, Kuo S., 2007. "Demand For Food Quantity And Quality In China," Economic Research Report 7252, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    4. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Beaver, Margaret & Chapoto, Antony & Weber, Michael T., 2009. "Patterns of Urban Food Consumption and Expenditure in Zambia: An Overview Report Based on the CSO/MACO/FSRP Food Consumption Survey in Urban Areas of Lusaka, Kitwe, Mansa and Kasama, 2007-2008," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56802, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Reena das Nair & Shingie Chisoro, 2015. "The expansion of regional supermarket chains: Changing models of retailing and the implications for local supplier capabilities in South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," WIDER Working Paper Series 114, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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    Cited by:

    1. Jody Harris & Phuong Hong Nguyen & Lan Mai Tran & Phuong Nam Huynh, 2020. "Nutrition transition in Vietnam: changing food supply, food prices, household expenditure, diet and nutrition outcomes," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(5), pages 1141-1155, October.
    2. Jody Harris & Brian Chisanga & Scott Drimie & Gina Kennedy, 2019. "Nutrition transition in Zambia: Changing food supply, food prices, household consumption, diet and nutrition outcomes," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 11(2), pages 371-387, April.
    3. Leon Gwaka & Job Dubihlela, 2020. "The Resilience of Smallholder Livestock Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Risks Imbedded in Rural Livestock Systems," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-11, July.

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