IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/unu/wpaper/wp-2020-88.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Competition and inclusive regional economic growth in food production: Barriers to entry and the role of African multinational corporations

Author

Listed:
  • Teboho Bosiu
  • Thando Vilakazi

Abstract

The growth of African multinational companies in Southern and East Africa in recent decades brings with it a great opportunity for development of productive capacity in the region and greater regional integration. This study identifies three emerging multinationals in the region?Trade Kings (from Zambia), Export Trading Group (Kenya), and Mount Meru (Tanzania)?that have developed capabilities over time to become effective competitors of incumbent food production companies in other country markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Teboho Bosiu & Thando Vilakazi, 2020. "Competition and inclusive regional economic growth in food production: Barriers to entry and the role of African multinational corporations," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-88, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2020-88
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/Publications/Working-paper/PDF/wp2020-88.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Reena das Nair & Namhla Landani, 2019. "The role of supermarket chains in developing food, other fast-moving consumer goods and consumer goods suppliers in regional markets," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-59, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Channing Arndt & Simon J. Roberts, 2018. "Key issues in regional growth and integration in Southern Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 297-314, May.
    3. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
    4. Brewer, Thomas L. & Young, Stephen, 2000. "The Multilateral Investment System and Multinational Enterprises," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199241101.
    5. Reena das Nair & Shingie Chisoro-Dube, 2015. "The expansion of regional supermarket chains: Changing models of retailing and the implications for local supplier capabilities in South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-114, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Grietjie Verhoef, 2019. "Latecomer Challenge: African Multinationals from the Periphery," Chapters, in: George Yungchih Wang (ed.), Globalization, IntechOpen.
    7. Clemens Lutz & Ron Kemp & S. Gerhard Dijkstra, 2010. "Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 19-33, July.
    8. Reena das Nair & Shingie Chisoro, 2015. "The expansion of regional supermarket chains: Changing models of retailing and the implications for local supplier capabilities in South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," WIDER Working Paper Series 114, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Grace Nsomba & Thando Vilakazi, 2021. "Barriers to entry and the role of African multinational corporations: Entrants in intermediate industrial products (inputs into construction)," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-143, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Grace Nsomba & Thando Vilakazi, 2021. "Barriers to entry and the role of African multinational corporations: Entrants in intermediate industrial products (inputs into construction)," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-143, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Altenburg, Tilman & Kulke, Elmar & Reeg, Caroline & Peterskovsky, Lisa & Hampel-Milagrosa, Aimée, 2016. "Making retail modernisation in developing countries inclusive: a development policy perspective," Discussion Papers 2/2016, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    3. Roberts Simon, 2017. "Working Paper 255 - Competition and industrial policies relating to food production in southern Africa," Working Paper Series 2366, African Development Bank.
    4. Brian Chisanga & Olipa Zulu-Mbata, 2018. "The changing food expenditure patterns and trends in Zambia: implications for agricultural policies," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 721-740, June.
    5. Michele Peruzzi & Alessio Terzi, 2018. "Growth Accelerations Strategies," CID Working Papers 91a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    6. Jarreau, Joachim & Poncet, Sandra, 2012. "Export sophistication and economic growth: Evidence from China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 281-292.
    7. Dennis, Allen & Shepherd, Ben, 2007. "Trade costs, barriers to entry, and export diversification in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4368, The World Bank.
    8. Robert Z. Lawrence & Lawrence Edward, 2010. "Do Developed and Developing Countries Compete Head to Head in High Tech?," Working Paper Series WP10-8, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    9. International Monetary Fund, 2015. "Central and Eastern Europe: New Member States (NMS) Policy Forum, 2014, Selected Issues Paper," IMF Staff Country Reports 2015/098, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Pedro Moncarz & Marcelo Olarreaga & Marcel Vaillant, 2016. "Regionalism as Industrial Policy: Evidence from MERCOSUR," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 359-373, February.
    11. Bahar, Dany & Rosenow, Samuel & Stein, Ernesto & Wagner, Rodrigo, 2019. "Export take-offs and acceleration: Unpacking cross-sector linkages in the evolution of comparative advantage," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 48-60.
    12. Florent Silve & Alexander Plekhanov, 2018. "Institutions, innovation and growth : Evidence from industry data," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 26(3), pages 335-362, July.
    13. Hailu, Degol & Kipgen, Chinpihoi, 2017. "The Extractives Dependence Index (EDI)," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 251-264.
    14. Naima Chrid & Sami Saafi & Mohamed Chakroun, 2021. "Export Upgrading and Economic Growth: a Panel Cointegration and Causality Analysis," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 12(2), pages 811-841, June.
    15. Stephan Huber, 2018. "Product Sophistication and Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment," Contributions to Economics, in: Product Characteristics in International Economics, chapter 0, pages 51-90, Springer.
    16. Byron Gangnes & Ari Van Assche, 2010. "Global Production Networks in Electronics and Intra-Asian Trade," LICOS Discussion Papers 25710, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    17. Lansana Bangoura & Diadié Diaw & Karim Barkat, 2013. "Does North-South trade favors training effects : What to learn from trade sophistication links?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(4), pages 2763-2777.
    18. Kuroiwa, Ikuo, 2014. "Value added trade and structure of high-technology exports in China," IDE Discussion Papers 449, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    19. Alje van Dam & Koen Frenken, 2019. "Variety, Complexity and Economic Development," Papers 1903.07997, arXiv.org.
    20. Sanjib Pohit & Sanjukta Basu, 2012. "High Technology Merchandise Exports: Where does India Stand?," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 13(2), pages 183-206, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    African multinational corporations; Multinational firms; barriers to entry; food production; Regional integration;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2020-88. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/widerfi.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Siméon Rapin (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/widerfi.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.