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Dimensions of Subjective Well-Being

Author

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  • Arie Kapteyn

    ()

  • Jinkook Lee

    ()

  • Caroline Tassot

    ()

  • Hana Vonkova

    ()

  • Gema Zamarro

    ()

Abstract

We use two waves of a population based survey (the RAND American Life Panel) to investigate the relations between various evaluative and experienced well-being measures based on the English Longitudinal Study of Aging, the Gallup Wellbeing Index, and a 12-item hedonic well-being module of the Health and Retirement Study. In a randomized set-up we administered several versions of the survey with different response scales. Using factor analysis, we find that all evaluative measures load on the same factor, but the positive and negative experienced affect measures load on different factors. We find evidence of an effect of response scales on both the estimated number of underlying factors and their relations with demographics. We conclude that finer response scales allowing more nuanced answers offer more reliability. The relation of evaluative and experienced measures with demographics are very different; perhaps the most striking aspect is the lack of a consistent relation of experienced well-being measures with income, while evaluative well-being is strongly positively related with income. Copyright The Author(s) 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Arie Kapteyn & Jinkook Lee & Caroline Tassot & Hana Vonkova & Gema Zamarro, 2015. "Dimensions of Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 625-660, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:123:y:2015:i:3:p:625-660
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-014-0753-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Setareh Ranjbar & Stefan Sperlich, 2020. "A Note on Empirical Studies of Life-Satisfaction: Unhappy with Semiparametrics?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 21(6), pages 2193-2212, August.
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    7. O'Connor, Kelsey J., 2020. "The effect of immigration on natives’ well-being in the European Union," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 257-274.
    8. Li, Qian & Stoeckl, Natalie & King, David, 2019. "Using the life-satisfaction approach to quantify the complex inter-related impacts of coal mining on host communities: A case study in Shanxi, China," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 305-316.
    9. Gunvor Marie Dyrdal & Espen Røysamb & Ragnhild Bang Nes & Joar Vittersø, 2019. "When Life Happens: Investigating Short and Long-Term Effects of Life Stressors on Life Satisfaction in a Large Sample of Norwegian Mothers," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 20(6), pages 1689-1715, August.
    10. Attila Lengyel & Sándor Kovács & Anetta Müller & Lóránt Dávid & Szilvia Szőke & Éva Bácsné Bába, 2019. "Sustainability and Subjective Well-Being: How Students Weigh Dimensions," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(23), pages 1-18, November.
    11. Graham F. Moore & Rebecca Cox & Rhiannon E. Evans & Britt Hallingberg & Jemma Hawkins & Hannah J. Littlecott & Sara J. Long & Simon Murphy, 2018. "School, Peer and Family Relationships and Adolescent Substance Use, Subjective Wellbeing and Mental Health Symptoms in Wales: a Cross Sectional Study," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(6), pages 1951-1965, December.
    12. Hana Vonkova, 2019. "Life Satisfaction among Different Groups of Children: Self-Reports, Differential Scale Usage and Anchoring Vignettes," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(6), pages 2111-2136, December.
    13. Carol Graham, 2005. "The Economics of Happiness," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 6(3), pages 41-55, July.

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