IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/soinre/v119y2014i1p25-48.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Feeling Close to Fellow Citizens in Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand

Author

Listed:
  • Chau-kiu Cheung

    ()

  • Raymond Chan
  • Wing-chung Ho

Abstract

Feeling close to fellow citizens in the city is a feature of social cohesion that is worth investigation among East Asian societies for exploring societal conditions for the closeness. Because of the variation of such conditions among the societies, differentials in the closeness among the societies are possible. As the variation of societal conditions can translate into differences in personal characteristics and experiences, such differences are likely to explain differentials in the closeness. This likelihood is a focus for the present study, which surveyed 4,087 adult citizens in Hong Kong (n = 681), South Korea (n = 1,006), Taiwan (n = 1,200), and Thailand (n = 1,200). Results revealed significant differentials in the closeness among the societies, showing that it was highest in Thailand and lowest in Taiwan. Furthermore, these differentials were largely due to differences in personal and characteristics among citizens in the four societies. Among the significant predictors of the closeness, work-family conflict and the costliness of medical expense are two experiences. The two experiences, as well as other predictors, champion a conflict or social force explanation for citizens’ closeness. Accordingly, conflict or social force that is incapacitating would estrange the incapacitated individual from others. The results and explanation imply that relieving work and family conflicts is relevant to lifting citizens’ closeness. In conclusion, the East Asian societies manifested differentials in citizens’ social cohesion, and the differentials are explicable by differentials in resources and conflicts among the societies. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Chau-kiu Cheung & Raymond Chan & Wing-chung Ho, 2014. "Feeling Close to Fellow Citizens in Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(1), pages 25-48, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:119:y:2014:i:1:p:25-48
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-013-0483-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-013-0483-8
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jan Janmaat, 2011. "Social Cohesion as a Real-life Phenomenon: Assessing the Explanatory Power of the Universalist and Particularist Perspectives," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 100(1), pages 61-83, January.
    2. Hung Wong, 2011. "Quality of Life of Poor People Living in Remote Areas in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 100(3), pages 435-450, February.
    3. Claudio O. Delang & Ho Cheuk Lung, 2010. "Public Housing and Poverty Concentration in Urban Neighbourhoods: The Case of Hong Kong in the 1990s," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(7), pages 1391-1413, June.
    4. Sonja Drobnič & Barbara Beham & Patrick Präg, 2010. "Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 205-225, November.
    5. Jan Janmaat, 2011. "Erratum to: Social Cohesion as a Real-Life Phenomenon: Assessing the Explanatory Power of the Universalist and Particularist Perspectives," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 100(2), pages 369-369, January.
    6. Darunee Jongudomkarn & Laura Camfield, 2006. "Exploring the Quality of Life of People in North Eastern and Southern Thailand," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 78(3), pages 489-529, September.
    7. Tiwsakul, Rungpaka Amy & Hackley, Chris, 2012. "Postmodern paradoxes in Thai-Asian consumer identity," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 490-496.
    8. Mason, Andrew, 2010. "Integration, Cohesion and National Identity: Theoretical Reflections on Recent British Policy," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(04), pages 857-874, October.
    9. Thomas Maloutas & Maro Pantelidou Malouta, 2004. "The glass menagerie of urban governance and social cohesion: concepts and stakes/concepts as stakes," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(2), pages 449-465, June.
    10. Kui-Wai Li & Tung Liu & Hoi Kuan Lam & Liang Wang, 2011. "Economic Integration of Mainland China and the Hong Kong SAR," Chinese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 92-114, July.
    11. Kevin Hewison, 2005. "Neo-liberalism and Domestic Capital: The Political Outcomes of the Economic Crisis in Thailand," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 310-330.
    12. Chaonan Chen, 2006. "Does the Completeness of a Household-Based Convoy Matter in Intergenerational Support Exchanges?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 79(1), pages 117-142, October.
    13. Natalia Letki, 2008. "Does Diversity Erode Social Cohesion? Social Capital and Race in British Neighbourhoods," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 56, pages 99-126, March.
    14. Chang, Shu-Sen & Gunnell, David & Sterne, Jonathan A.C. & Lu, Tsung-Hsueh & Cheng, Andrew T.A., 2009. "Was the economic crisis 1997-1998 responsible for rising suicide rates in East/Southeast Asia? A time-trend analysis for Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Thailand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1322-1331, April.
    15. Adrienne La Grange, 2011. "Neighbourhood and Class," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 48(6), pages 1181-1200, May.
    16. Petra Böhnke, 2008. "Does Society Matter? Life Satisfaction in the Enlarged Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 87(2), pages 189-210, June.
    17. Mocan, H. Naci & Tekin, Erdal & Zax, Jeffrey S., 2004. "The Demand for Medical Care in Urban China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 289-304, February.
    18. Stacey G. Ulbig, 2002. "Policies, Procedures, and People: Sources of Support for Government?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 83(3), pages 789-809.
    19. Yamaoka, Kazue, 2008. "Social capital and health and well-being in East Asia: A population-based study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(4), pages 885-899, February.
    20. Ian Holliday, 2000. "Productivist Welfare Capitalism: Social Policy in East Asia," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 48(4), pages 706-723, September.
    21. Ka Lin & Yun Xu & Tianhai Huang & Jiahua Zhang, 2013. "Social Exclusion and Its Causes in East Asian Societies: Evidences from SQSQ Survey Data," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 641-660, July.
    22. Dayton-Johnson, Jeff, 2003. "Knitted warmth: the simple analytics of social cohesion," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 623-645, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:119:y:2014:i:1:p:25-48. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.