IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/soinre/v113y2013i1p471-490.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Morale in Relation to Caring and Social Exclusion in Society

Author

Listed:
  • Chau-kiu Cheung

    ()

Abstract

Morale, as a future-oriented indicator of well-being, is susceptible to caring and social exclusion in society, with respect to social integration theory. The influences of caring and social exclusion perceived in society merit the concern of the present study. In addition, the study explores personal background characteristics as conditions for moderating the influences. A telephone survey of 1,526 adults in Hong Kong in China provided data for the study. Results demonstrated the main effects of caring and social exclusion perceived in society on morale and conditions that moderated the effects. The strongest condition is age, such that social exclusion was particularly demoralizing to the older person. In contrast, the person’s wealth did not have a main effect on morale. Results therefore favor the idealist explanation rather than materialist explanation for morale. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Chau-kiu Cheung, 2013. "Morale in Relation to Caring and Social Exclusion in Society," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 471-490, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:1:p:471-490
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-012-0105-x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-012-0105-x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Doh Shin & Takashi Inoguchi, 2009. "Avowed Happiness in Confucian Asia: Ascertaining its Distribution, Patterns, and Sources," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 92(2), pages 405-427, June.
    2. Oshio, Takashi & Kobayashi, Miki, 2010. "Income inequality, perceived happiness, and self-rated health: Evidence from nationwide surveys in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(9), pages 1358-1366, May.
    3. Claudio O. Delang & Ho Cheuk Lung, 2010. "Public Housing and Poverty Concentration in Urban Neighbourhoods: The Case of Hong Kong in the 1990s," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(7), pages 1391-1413, June.
    4. Robert Cummins & Anna Lau & David Mellor & Mark Stokes, 2009. "Encouraging Governments to Enhance the Happiness of Their Nation: Step 1: Understand Subjective Wellbeing," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 91(1), pages 23-36, March.
    5. Hilke Brockmann & Jan Delhey & Christian Welzel & Hao Yuan, 2009. "The China Puzzle: Falling Happiness in a Rising Economy," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 387-405, August.
    6. Berry, Helen Louise & Welsh, Jennifer A., 2010. "Social capital and health in Australia: An overview from the household, income and labour dynamics in Australia survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(4), pages 588-596, February.
    7. Webber, Martin P. & Huxley, Peter J., 2007. "Measuring access to social capital: The validity and reliability of the Resource Generator-UK and its association with common mental disorder," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 481-492, August.
    8. Rati Ram, 2010. "Social Capital and Happiness: Additional Cross-Country Evidence," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 409-418, August.
    9. Ottar Hellevik, 2003. "Economy, Values and Happiness in Norway," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 243-283, September.
    10. Rati Ram, 2009. "Government spending and happiness of the population: additional evidence from large cross-country samples," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 483-490, March.
    11. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
    12. Gill Seyfang, 2003. "Growing cohesive communities one favour at a time: social exclusion, active citizenship and time banks," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 699-706, September.
    13. Natalia Letki, 2008. "Does Diversity Erode Social Cohesion? Social Capital and Race in British Neighbourhoods," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 56, pages 99-126, March.
    14. Chau-kiu Cheung & Kwan-kwok Leung, 2007. "Relating social welfare to life satisfaction in the postmodern era of Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 84(1), pages 53-70, October.
    15. Marne Arthaud-day & Janet Near, 2005. "The Wealth of Nations and the Happiness of Nations: Why “Accounting” Matters," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 74(3), pages 511-548, December.
    16. Stanley, John K. & Hensher, David A. & Stanley, Janet R. & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne, 2011. "Mobility, social exclusion and well-being: Exploring the links," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 789-801, October.
    17. Robert Oxoby, 2009. "Understanding social inclusion, social cohesion, and social capital," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(12), pages 1133-1152, October.
    18. Åberg Yngwe, Monica & Fritzell, Johan & Lundberg, Olle & Diderichsen, Finn & Burström, Bo, 2003. "Exploring relative deprivation: Is social comparison a mechanism in the relation between income and health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(8), pages 1463-1473, October.
    19. Delbosc, Alexa & Currie, Graham, 2011. "Exploring the relative influences of transport disadvantage and social exclusion on well-being," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 555-562, August.
    20. Yamaoka, Kazue, 2008. "Social capital and health and well-being in East Asia: A population-based study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(4), pages 885-899, February.
    21. Claire Wallace & Florian Pichler, 2009. "More Participation, Happier Society? A Comparative Study of Civil Society and the Quality of Life," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(2), pages 255-274, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chau-kiu Cheung, 2015. "Normative Influences on Civility in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 229-246, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:1:p:471-490. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.