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Multilateral determinants of regionalism revisited

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  • Katerina Gradeva
  • Dany Jaimovich

Abstract

The idea that some features of the multilateral trading system create incentives for countries to join preferential trade agreements (PTAs) is among the first and most influential explanations for the wave of regionalism in the last decades. Until recently, only a few empirical studies have explored this hypothesis and their results have been accepted by many researchers and policy-makers to be a fact. In this study we revisit the question of whether multilateral events are important determinants of regionalism. We use an extended dataset and implement several empirical specifications in the analysis. Unlike previous work, our results provide little support for the relevance of variables such as the number of GATT/WTO members, ongoing trade negotiation rounds, and trade disputes as predictors of PTA formation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Katerina Gradeva & Dany Jaimovich, 2014. "Multilateral determinants of regionalism revisited," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 163-203, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:revint:v:9:y:2014:i:2:p:163-203
    DOI: 10.1007/s11558-014-9193-5
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Egger & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2014. "Introduction to the special issue on the political economy of multilateral trade negotiations," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 135-142, June.
    2. Teresa L. Cyrus, 2021. "Why Do Countries Form Regional Trade Agreements? A Discrete-Time Survival Analysis," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 417-434, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Free trade agreements; World trade organization; Regionalism; F13; F53;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations

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