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Delphi-based consensus study into a framework of community resilience to disaster

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  • Saud Alshehri
  • Yacine Rezgui
  • Haijiang Li

Abstract

Disasters cannot be prevented but their impacts can be mitigated through adapted disaster management strategies. Several studies confirm that community resilience is a significant factor in disaster management. Saudi Arabia is (a) increasingly exposed to disasters, as reflected in recent events, and (b) lacks a credible disaster management strategy. This paper aims to develop a framework of community resilience to disaster in Saudi Arabia. A three-round Delphi study is conducted using a local and an international panel of experts with in-depth knowledge in the wide field of disaster management. General dimensions and criteria for consideration are derived from the academic literature. The latter are used by the expert panel as a starting point to achieve consensus on a framework of community resilience to disasters, focused on six resilience dimensions: social; economic; physical and environmental; governance; health and well-being; and information and communication. A total of 62 criteria are identified. Fifty-seven of these criteria achieved consensus in Round 2. An additional five criteria reached consensus in the third round. The resulting community resilience framework involves seven to fourteen criteria in each of the six identified dimensions. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Saud Alshehri & Yacine Rezgui & Haijiang Li, 2015. "Delphi-based consensus study into a framework of community resilience to disaster," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(3), pages 2221-2245, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:75:y:2015:i:3:p:2221-2245
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-014-1423-x
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    Cited by:

    1. Mohammad S. M. Almulhim & Dexter V. L. Hunt & Chris D. F. Rogers, 2020. "A Resilience and Environmentally Sustainable Assessment Framework (RESAF) for Domestic Building Materials in Saudi Arabia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-24, April.
    2. Ming Zhong & Kairong Lin & Guoping Tang & Qian Zhang & Yang Hong & Xiaohong Chen, 2020. "A Framework to Evaluate Community Resilience to Urban Floods: A Case Study in Three Communities," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(4), pages 1-21, February.
    3. Manyena, Bernard & Machingura, Fortunate & O'Keefe, Phil, 2019. "Disaster Resilience Integrated Framework for Transformation (DRIFT): A new approach to theorising and operationalising resilience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-1.
    4. Yan Deng & Guiwu Su & Na Gao & Lei Sun, 2019. "Perceptions of earthquake emergency response and rescue in China: a comparison between experts and local practitioners," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 97(2), pages 643-664, June.
    5. Hoang Long Nguyen & Rajendra Akerkar, 2020. "Modelling, Measuring, and Visualising Community Resilience: A Systematic Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(19), pages 1-26, September.
    6. Adriana Luciano & Federica Pascale & Francesco Polverino & Alison Pooley, 2020. "Measuring Age-Friendly Housing: A Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-35, January.

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