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Transitional dynamics and the distribution of assets

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  • Francesc Obiols-Homs

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  • Carlos Urrutia

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Abstract

We study the evolution of the distribution of assets in a discrete time, deterministic growth model with log-utility, a minimum consumption requirement, Cobb-Douglas technology, and agents differing in initial assets. We prove that the coefficient of variation in assets across agents decreases monotonically in a transition to the steady state from below, if (i) the consumption requirement is zero, or (ii) the consumption requirement is not too big and the initial capital stock is large enough. We also show how a positive consumption requirement or a small elasticity of substitution between capital and labor can generate non-monotonic paths for inequality. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Francesc Obiols-Homs & Carlos Urrutia, 2005. "Transitional dynamics and the distribution of assets," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 25(2), pages 381-400, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joecth:v:25:y:2005:i:2:p:381-400 DOI: 10.1007/s00199-003-0447-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Aloy & Gilles De Truchis, 2012. "Estimation and Testing for Fractional Cointegration," Working Papers halshs-00793206, HAL.
    2. Chen, Chien-Liang & Kuan, Chung-Ming & Lin, Chu-Chia, 2007. "Saving and housing of Taiwanese households: New evidence from quantile regression analyses," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 102-126, June.
    3. Ales Bulir & Alma Romero-Barrutieta & Jose Daniel Rodríguez-Delgado, 2011. "The Dynamic Implications of Debt Relief for Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 11/157, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Garci­a-Peñalosa, Cecilia, 2008. "Distributional dynamics in a neoclassical growth model: The role of elastic labor supply," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1399-1431, May.
    5. Luis San Vicente Portes, 2005. "On the Distributional Effects of Trade Policy: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 358, Society for Computational Economics.
    6. San Vicente Portes, Luis, 2009. "On the distributional effects of trade policy: Dynamics of household saving and asset prices," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 944-970, August.
    7. Tamotsu Nakamura, 2014. "On Ramsey's conjecture with AK technology," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 875-884.
    8. Espino, Emilio, 2007. "Equilibrium portfolios in the neoclassical growth model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 137(1), pages 673-687, November.
    9. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2012. "Income Inequality, Mobility, and the Accumulation of Capital: The Role of Heterogeneous Labor Productivity," Working Papers halshs-00793209, HAL.
    10. Yoshiyasu Ono & Akihisa Shibata, 2006. "Capital Income Taxation and Specialization Patterns: Investment Tax vs. Saving Tax," KIER Working Papers 613, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    11. Beladi, Hamid & Chao, Chi-Chur & Hollas, Daniel, 2013. "How growing asset inequality affects developing economies," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, pages 43-51.
    12. Yoshiyasu Ono & Akihisa Shibata, 2006. "Capital Income Taxation and Specialization Patterns: Investment Tax vs. Saving Tax," ISER Discussion Paper 0649, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wealth dynamics; Heterogeneous agents; Neoclassical growth model.;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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