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Lending attitude as a financial accelerator in a credit network economy

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  • Daiki Asanuma

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Abstract

In existing literature, commercial banks are often considered mere financial intermediaries that facilitate the flow of credit in an imperfect credit market. However, as demonstrated in the history of financial instability, the behavior of financial institutions plays an important role. This paper examines how lenders’ attitudes affect macroeconomic performance. In our analysis, the economy is composed of multiple borrowers (firms) and one lender (bank). Each borrower is directly connected to the lender through its credit contract. At the same time, each borrower is indirectly connected to all the other borrowers within the credit network. Using this model, we execute computer simulations to examine the economic consequences of lending attitudes. The results of the simulations demonstrate that the bank’s lending attitude functions as a financial accelerator; that is, it significantly affects the dynamics of the economic system through the credit network. Consequently, the same level of exogenous shock generates completely different outcomes depending on the different lending attitudes. The results also show that there exists an optimal lending attitude that leads to high economic growth and a stable growth path. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Daiki Asanuma, 2013. "Lending attitude as a financial accelerator in a credit network economy," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 8(2), pages 231-247, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jeicoo:v:8:y:2013:i:2:p:231-247
    DOI: 10.1007/s11403-012-0102-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. He, Jianmin & Sui, Xin & Li, Shouwei, 2016. "An endogenous model of the credit network," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 441(C), pages 1-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agent-based model; Credit network economy; Bank’s lending attitudes; Financial accelerator; Optimal lending attitude; E51; G21;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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