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Friday the 13th and the philosophical basis of financial economics

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  • Brian Lucey

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Abstract

The Friday the 13th anomaly of Kolb and Rodriguez (1987) is revisited in an international context. Drawing on the philosophy of science approach of Lakatos (1978), the paper argues the importance of “anomalies” and the need for triangulation. Using the FTSE world indices over 1988–2000 for 19 countries, it is found that there is some evidence that returns on Friday the 13th are statistically different from, and generally greater than, returns on other Fridays. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the possibility of an emergent paradigm incorporating work such as Jacobsen and Bouman (1998) and Kamstra, Kramer, and Levi (2000a). Copyright Springer 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Lucey, 2000. "Friday the 13th and the philosophical basis of financial economics," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 24(3), pages 294-301, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:24:y:2000:i:3:p:294-301
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02752610
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Saunders, Edward M, Jr, 1993. "Stock Prices and Wall Street Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1337-1345, December.
    2. Frankfurter, George M. & McGoun, Elton G., 1999. "Ideology and the theory of financial economics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 159-177, June.
    3. Unknown, 1998. "Research Updates," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-17, February.
    4. Paul Brockman & David Michayluk, 1998. "The persistent holiday effect: additional evidence," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 205-209.
    5. Dyl, Edward A & Maberly, Edwin D, 1988. " The Anomaly That Isn't There: A Comment on Friday the Thirteenth," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(5), pages 1285-1286, December.
    6. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    7. Kolb, Robert W & Rodriguez, Ricardo J, 1987. " Friday the Thirteenth: 'Part VII'--A Note," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(5), pages 1385-1387, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ya’akov M. Bayer, Bradley J. Ruffle, Ze’ev Shtudiner, Ro’i Zultan, 2018. "Costly Superstitious Beliefs: Experimental Evidence," LCERPA Working Papers 0114, Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis, revised 01 Mar 2018.
    2. Auer, Benjamin R. & Rottmann, Horst, 2014. "Is there a Friday the 13th effect in emerging Asian stock markets?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 1(C), pages 17-26.
    3. Woo, Chi-Keung & Horowitz, Ira & Luk, Stephen & Lai, Aaron, 2008. "Willingness to pay and nuanced cultural cues: Evidence from Hong Kong's license-plate auction market," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 35-53, February.
    4. Glenn Boyle & Andrew Hagan & R. Seini O'Connor & Nick Whitwell, 2004. "Emotion, fear and superstition in the New Zealand stockmarket," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 65-85.

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