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Chronic health conditions, labour market participation and resource consumption among immigrant and native-born residents of Canada

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  • Morton Beiser

    ()

  • Feng Hou

Abstract

Immigrants with chronic illnesses do not inevitably dilute the economic benefits of immigration or create excessive burden. Timely programs to promote integration can help ensure a favourable balance between economic contribution and social cost. Neglecting the health of new immigrants may eventuate in long-term disability. Copyright Swiss School of Public Health 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Morton Beiser & Feng Hou, 2014. "Chronic health conditions, labour market participation and resource consumption among immigrant and native-born residents of Canada," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(3), pages 541-547, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:59:y:2014:i:3:p:541-547
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-014-0544-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2013. "Mustn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 55-82, March.
    2. Peter Dungan & Tony Fang & Morley Gunderson, 2013. "Macroeconomic Impacts of C anadian Immigration: Results from a Macro Model," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 51(1), pages 174-195, March.
    3. Beiser, Morton & Hou, Feng, 2001. "Language acquisition, unemployment and depressive disorder among Southeast Asian refugees: a 10-year study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(10), pages 1321-1334, November.
    4. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2004.044602_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Gregor Wolbring, 2008. "The Politics of Ableism," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 51(2), pages 252-258, June.
    6. Alan Barrett & Bertrand Maître, 2013. "Immigrant welfare receipt across Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 8-23, March.
    7. Mireille Laroche, 2000. "Health Status and Health Services Utilization of Canada's Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Populations," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(1), pages 51-75, March.
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2012.301185_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lawrence So & Hude Quan, 2012. "Coming to Canada: the difference in health trajectories between immigrants and native-born residents," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 57(6), pages 893-904, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emma Benn, 2014. "Nativity and cognitive disability among children: a unique comparison with reduced selection bias," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(5), pages 809-817, October.

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