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Health Status and Health Services Utilization of Canada's Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Populations


  • Mireille Laroche


This paper compares the health status of immigrants and their utilization rates of health services to those of the Canadian-born population using data contained within two cycles (1985 and 1991) of the General Social Survey (GSS). Our main results show that neither the health status of immigrants nor their utilization rates of health services differ significantly from those of the Canadian-born population. When both data sets are pooled, the estimated results show that immigrants' health status and their use of health services have remained unchanged over time.

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  • Mireille Laroche, 2000. "Health Status and Health Services Utilization of Canada's Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Populations," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(1), pages 51-75, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:26:y:2000:i:1:p:51-75

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Belén Sanz & Enrique Regidor & Silvia Galindo & Cruz Pascual & Lourdes Lostao & José Díaz & Elisabeth Sánchez, 2011. "Pattern of health services use by immigrants from different regions of the world residing in Spain," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 56(5), pages 567-576, October.
    2. Monika Sander, 2007. "Return Migration and the "Healthy Immigrant Effect"," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 60, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Ellen M. Gee & Karen M. Kobayashi & Steven G. Prus, 2003. "Examining the "Healthy Immigrant Effect" in Later Life: Findings from the Canadian Community Health Survey," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 98, McMaster University.
    4. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2013. "Mustn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 55-82, March.
    5. James Ted McDonald, 2005. "The Health Behaviors of Immigrants and Native-born People in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 144, McMaster University.
    6. Siddiqi, Arjumand & Zuberi, Daniyal & Nguyen, Quynh C., 2009. "The role of health insurance in explaining immigrant versus non-immigrant disparities in access to health care: Comparing the United States to Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 1452-1459, November.
    7. Rivera, Berta & Casal, Bruno & Currais, Luis, 2013. "Healthy Immigrant Effect: Trayectoria de salud de la población inmigrante a partir de la ENSE 2011-2012/Healthy Immigrant Effect: An Empirical Approach to the Health Trajectory of Immigrant Population," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 339-358, Septiembr.
    8. Asanin, Jennifer & Wilson, Kathi, 2008. ""I spent nine years looking for a doctor": Exploring access to health care among immigrants in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(6), pages 1271-1283, March.
    9. Sara Rellstab & Marco Pecoraro & Alberto Holly & Philippe Wanner & Karine Renard, 2016. "The Migrant Health Gap and the Role of Labour Market Status: Evidence from Switzerland," IRENE Working Papers 16-14, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    10. Lídia Farré, 2016. "New evidence on the healthy immigrant effect," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(2), pages 365-394, April.
    11. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2006. "Unhealthy assimilation: Why do immigrants converge to American health status levels?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 337-360, May.
    12. Dean, Jennifer Asanin & Wilson, Kathi, 2010. ""My health has improved because I always have everything I need here...": A qualitative exploration of health improvement and decline among immigrants," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1219-1228, April.
    13. Su, Dejun & Li, Lifeng & Pagán, José A., 2008. "Acculturation and the use of complementary and alternative medicine," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 439-453, January.
    14. Steven Kennedy & James Ted McDonald & Nicholas Biddle, 2006. "The Healthy Immigrant Effect and Immigrant Selection: Evidence from Four Countries," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 164, McMaster University.
    15. Sisira Sarma & Rose Anne Devlin & Jason Gilliland & Karen Campbell & Gregory Zaric, 2013. "The Effect of Leisure-time Physical Activity on Obesity, Diabetes, High BP and Heart Disease among Canadians: Evidence from 2000/01 to 2005/06," Working Papers 130001, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    16. Morton Beiser & Feng Hou, 2014. "Chronic health conditions, labour market participation and resource consumption among immigrant and native-born residents of Canada," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(3), pages 541-547, June.

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