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Soft skills, hard skills, and individual innovativeness

Author

Listed:
  • Achmad Fajar Hendarman

    () (Friedrich Schiller University, (FSU)
    Bandung Institute of Technology)

  • Uwe Cantner

    (Friedrich Schiller University, (FSU)
    I2M Group, University of Southern Denmark)

Abstract

Abstract This paper contributes to the literature on skills and innovativeness of employees at the individual level. Based on a properly designed empirical analysis, the findings improve our understanding of the relation between soft skills, hard skills and individual innovativeness. Cross-sectional data of Indonesian firms from different industries are used from an online survey on manager and worker perceptions related to individual innovation performance on the one hand and individual skills on the other hand. The results show that soft skills and hard skills are significantly and positively associated with individual level innovativeness. However, no complementarity (positive interaction effect) is found between soft skills and hard skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Achmad Fajar Hendarman & Uwe Cantner, 2018. "Soft skills, hard skills, and individual innovativeness," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 8(2), pages 139-169, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurasi:v:8:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s40821-017-0076-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s40821-017-0076-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Erol Taymaz & G, rard Ballot, 1997. "The dynamics of firms in a micro-to-macro model: The role of training, learning and innovation," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 435-457.
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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Castellani & Mariacristina Piva & Torben Schubert & Marco Vivarelli, 2016. "R&D and Productivity in the US and the EU: Sectoral Specificities and Differences in the Crisis," John H Dunning Centre for International Business Discussion Papers jhd-dp2016-03, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. repec:eee:tefoso:v:138:y:2019:i:c:p:279-291 is not listed on IDEAS

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