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PISA: What makes the difference?


  • Andreas Ammermueller



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Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Ammermueller, 2007. "PISA: What makes the difference?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 263-287, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:33:y:2007:i:2:p:263-287 DOI: 10.1007/s00181-006-0102-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lauer, Charlotte, 2000. "Gender wage gap in West Germany: how far do gender differences in human capital matter?," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-07, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. West, Martin R. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2006. "Which school systems sort weaker students into smaller classes? International evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 944-968, December.
    3. Ben Jann, 2005. "Standard Errors for the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition," German Stata Users' Group Meetings 2005 03, Stata Users Group.
    4. John Bishop & Ludger Wossmann, 2004. "Institutional Effects in a Simple Model of Educational Production," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 17-38.
    5. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kitae Sohn, 2012. "A New Insight Into The Gender Gap In Math," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 135-155, January.
    2. Shiu-Sheng Chen & Ming-Ching Luoh, 2010. "Are Mathematics and Science Test Scores Good Indicators of Labor-Force Quality?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(1), pages 133-143, March.
    3. Baranov, Igor N., 2012. "Quality of Secondary Education in Russia: Between Soviet Legacy and Challenges of Global Competitiveness," Working Papers 538, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg State University.
    4. Engzell, Per, 2017. "What Do Books in the Home Proxy For? A Cautionary Tale," Working Paper Series 1/2016, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    5. Marina Murat & Davide Ferrari & Patrizio Frederic, 2012. "Immigrant students and educational systems. Cross-country evidence from PISA 2006," Department of Economics 0683, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Amini, Chiara & Commander, Simon, 2012. "Educational scores: How does Russia fare?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 508-527.
    7. Wagstaff, Adam & Wang, L. Choon, 2011. "A hybrid approach to efficiency measurement with empirical illustrations from education and health," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5751, The World Bank.
    8. Baranov, Igor N., 2012. "Quality of Secondary Education in Russia: Between Soviet Legacy and Challenges of Global Competitiveness," Working Papers 797, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg State University.
    9. Alina Botezat & Ruben R. Seiberlich, 2013. "Educational performance gaps in Eastern Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 21(4), pages 731-756, October.
    10. Murat Marina, 2012. "Do Immigrant Students Succeed? Evidence from Italy and France," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 12(3), pages 1-22, September.

    More about this item


    Educational production; PISA; Student performance; Decomposition; I21; H52;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education


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