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Unwed fathers’ ability to pay child support: New estimates accounting for multiple-partner fertility

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  • Marilyn Sinkewicz

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  • Irwin Garfinkel

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Suggested Citation

  • Marilyn Sinkewicz & Irwin Garfinkel, 2009. "Unwed fathers’ ability to pay child support: New estimates accounting for multiple-partner fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(2), pages 247-263, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:46:y:2009:i:2:p:247-263
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.0.0051
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0051
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dana Glei & Sara S. McLanahan & Irwin Garfinkel, 2002. "Assortative mating among unmarried parents: Implications for ability to pay child support," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 417-432.
    2. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, July.
    3. Miller, Cynthia & Garfinkel, Irwin & McLanahan, Sara, 1997. "Child Support in the U.S.: Can Fathers Afford to Pay More?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 43(3), pages 261-281, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ronald B. Mincy & Elia De la Cruz Toledo, 2014. "Unemployment and Child Support Compliance Through the Great Recession," Working Papers 14-01-ff, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    2. repec:pri:crcwel:wp10-15-ff is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Colleen Wynn, 2016. "Paternal Multipartner Fertility and Child Neighborhood Disorder," Working Papers wp16-07-ff.pdf, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    4. repec:eee:cysrev:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:547-557 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Evenhouse, Eirik & Reilly, Siobhan, 2010. "Women's multiple-partner fertility in the United States: Prevalence, correlates and trends, 1985-2008," MPRA Paper 26867, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer & Steven Cook, 2011. "The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 957-982, August.
    7. Maria Cancian & Yiyoon Chung & Daniel R. Meyer, 2016. "Fathers’ Imprisonment and Mothers’ Multiple-Partner Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 2045-2074, December.
    8. Terry-Ann L. Craigie, 2010. "Child Support Transfers under Family Complexity," Working Papers 1276, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    9. J. Bart Stykes & Wendy Manning & Susan L. Brown, 2013. "Nonresident Fathers and Formal Child Support: Evidence from the CPS, NSFG, and SIPP," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(46), pages 1299-1330, December.
    10. Maria Cancian & Daniel R. Meyer & Deborah Reed, 2010. "Promising Antipoverty Strategies for Families," Mathematica Policy Research Reports f945f7eaa0a84629bb0872ca4, Mathematica Policy Research.

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