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The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children

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  • Maria Cancian

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  • Daniel Meyer

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  • Steven Cook

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer & Steven Cook, 2011. "The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 957-982, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:48:y:2011:i:3:p:957-982
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-011-0041-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcia Carlson & Sara McLanahan & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, 2008. "Coparenting and nonresident fathers’ involvement with young children after a nonmarital birth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(2), pages 461-488, May.
    2. Robert A. Moffitt, 2000. "Welfare Benefits and Female Headship in U.S. Time Series," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 373-377, May.
    3. Michael Rendall & Lynda Clarke & H. Peters & Nalini Ranjit & Georgia Verropoulou, 1999. "Incomplete reporting of men’s fertility in the united states and britain: A research note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(1), pages 135-144, February.
    4. Irwin Garfinkel & Chien-Chung Huang & Sara S. McLanahan & Daniel S. Gaylin, 2003. "The roles of child support enforcement and welfare in non-marital childbearing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(1), pages 55-70, February.
    5. Anna Aizer & ASara McLanahan, 2006. "The Impact of Child Support Enforcement on Fertility, Parental Investments, and Child Well-Being," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(1).
    6. Donna Ginther & Robert Pollak, 2004. "Family structure and children’s educational outcomes: Blended families, stylized facts, and descriptive regressions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(4), pages 671-696, November.
    7. Karen Guzzo & Frank Furstenberg, 2007. "Multipartnered fertility among American men," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(3), pages 583-601, August.
    8. Sandra Hofferth, 2006. "Residential father family type and child well-being: Investment versus selection," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(1), pages 53-77, February.
    9. Marcia Carlson & Sara Mclanahan & Paula England, 2004. "Union formation in fragile families," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(2), pages 237-261, May.
    10. Arnstein Aassve, 2003. "The impact of economic resources on premarital childbearing and subsequent marriage among young American women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 105-126, February.
    11. Susan Stewart, 2002. "The effect of stepchildren on childbearing intentions and births," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(1), pages 181-197, February.
    12. Jason M. Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2009. "Education and Labor Market Consequences of Teenage Childbearing: Evidence Using the Timing of Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Fixed Effects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(2).
    13. Eirik Evenhouse & Siobhan Reilly, 2004. "A Sibling Study of Stepchild Well-being," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
    14. Lenna Nepomnyaschy, 2007. "Child support and father-child contact: Testing reciprocal pathways," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(1), pages 93-112, February.
    15. Geoffrey L. Wallace & Robert Haveman, 2007. "The implications of differences between employer and worker employment|earnings reports for policy evaluation," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 737-754.
    16. Marilyn Sinkewicz & Irwin Garfinkel, 2009. "Unwed fathers’ ability to pay child support: New estimates accounting for multiple-partner fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(2), pages 247-263, May.
    17. Anna Gassman-Pines & Hirokazu Yoshikawa, 2006. "Five-year effects of an anti-poverty program on marriage among never-married mothers," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 11-30.
    18. Robert J. Willis, 1999. "A Theory of Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 33-64, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chung, Yiyoon, 2015. "Does SNAP serve as a safety net for mothers facing an economic shock? An analysis of Black and White unwed mothers' responses to paternal imprisonment," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 179-192.
    2. Karen Benjamin Guzzo & Cassandra Dorius, 2016. "Challenges in Measuring and Studying Multipartnered Fertility in American Survey Data," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(4), pages 553-579, August.
    3. Maria Cancian & Yiyoon Chung & Daniel R. Meyer, 2016. "Fathers’ Imprisonment and Mothers’ Multiple-Partner Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 2045-2074, December.
    4. Thomas J. Cooke & Clara H. Mulder & Michael Thomas, 2016. "Union dissolution and migration," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(26), pages 741-760, April.
    5. Meyer, Daniel R. & Skinner, Christine & Davidson, Jacqueline, 2011. "Complex families and equality in child support obligations: A comparative policy analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1804-1812, October.
    6. Paula Fomby & Joshua A. Goode & Stefanie Mollborn, 2016. "Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children’s Aggressive Behavior at School Entry," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 1-26, February.
    7. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer, 2014. "Testing the Economic Independence Hypothesis: The Effect of an Exogenous Increase in Child Support on Subsequent Marriage and Cohabitation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 857-880, June.

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