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Five-year effects of an anti-poverty program on marriage among never-married mothers

Author

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  • Anna Gassman-Pines

    (New York University)

  • Hirokazu Yoshikawa

    (New York University)

Abstract

Using data from an experimental evaluation of the New Hope project, an anti-poverty program that increased employment and income, this study examined the effects of New Hope on entry into marriage among never-married mothers. Among never-married mothers, New Hope significantly increased rates of marriage. Five years after random assignment, 21 percent of women assigned to the New Hope condition were married, compared to 12 percent of those assigned to the control group. The New Hope impact on marriage was robust to variations in model specification. The program also increased income, wage growth, and goal efficacy among never-married mothers, and decreased depression. In non-experimental analyses, income and earnings were associated with higher probability of marriage and material hardship was associated with lower probability of marriage. © 2006 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Gassman-Pines & Hirokazu Yoshikawa, 2006. "Five-year effects of an anti-poverty program on marriage among never-married mothers," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 11-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:25:y:2006:i:1:p:11-30
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.20154
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20154
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    Cited by:

    1. Deborah Roempke Graefe & Daniel T. Lichter, 2008. "Marriage patterns among unwed mothers: Before and after PRWORA," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 479-497.
    2. Ronald Mincy & Jennifer Hill & Marilyn Sinkewicz, 2009. "Marriage: Cause or mere indicator of future earnings growth?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(3), pages 417-439.
    3. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer & Steven Cook, 2011. "The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 957-982, August.
    4. Scott Hankins & Mark Hoekstra, 2011. "Lucky in Life, Unlucky in Love?: The Effect of Random Income Shocks on Marriage and Divorce," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 403-426.
    5. Roderick Rose & Susan Parish & Joan Yoo, 2009. "Measuring Material Hardship among the US Population of Women with Disabilities Using Latent Class Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 94(3), pages 391-415, December.
    6. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer, 2014. "Testing the Economic Independence Hypothesis: The Effect of an Exogenous Increase in Child Support on Subsequent Marriage and Cohabitation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 857-880, June.
    7. Nancy R. Burstein, 2007. "Economic influences on marriage and divorce," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(2), pages 387-429.

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