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Circular, invisible, and ambiguous migrants: Components of difference in estimates of the number of unauthorized Mexican migrants in the United States

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  • Frank Bean
  • Rodolfo Corona
  • Rodolfo Tuiran
  • Karen Woodrow-Lafield
  • Jennifer Hook

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  • Frank Bean & Rodolfo Corona & Rodolfo Tuiran & Karen Woodrow-Lafield & Jennifer Hook, 2001. "Circular, invisible, and ambiguous migrants: Components of difference in estimates of the number of unauthorized Mexican migrants in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(3), pages 411-422, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:38:y:2001:i:3:p:411-422
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2001.0023
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Heer, 1979. "What is the annual net flow of undocumented mexican immigrants to the united states?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 16(3), pages 417-423, August.
    2. Enrico A. Marcelli & Manuel Pastor & Pascale M. Joassart, 1999. "Estimating the Effects of Informal Economic Activity: Evidence from Los Angeles County," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 579-607, September.
    3. Frank Bean & Allan King & Jeffrey Passel, 1983. "The number of illegal migrants of Mexican origin in the United States: Sex ratio-based estimates for 1980," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 20(1), pages 99-109, February.
    4. Robert Warren & Jennifer Peck, 1980. "Foreign-Born Emigration From The United States: 1960 To 1970," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 17(1), pages 71-84, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Magnus Lofstrom & Frank Bean, 2002. "Assessing immigrant policy options: Labor market conditions and postreform declines in immigrants’ receipt of welfare," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 617-637, November.
    2. Fernando Riosmena & Douglas S. Massey, 2012. "Pathways to El Norte: Origins, Destinations, and Characteristics of Mexican Migrants to the United States," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 3-36, March.
    3. Pablo Ibarraran & Darren Lubotsky, 2007. "Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 159-192, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Amior, Michael, 2020. "Immigration, local crowd-out and undercoverage bias," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108490, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2005. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(2), pages 239-281, April.
    6. Jennifer Hook & Weiwei Zhang & Frank D. Bean & Jeffrey S. Passel, 2006. "Foreign-born emigration: A new approach and estimates based on matched CPS files," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 361-382, May.
    7. Douglas S. Massey & Fernando Riosmena, 2010. "Undocumented Migration from Latin America in an Era of Rising U.S. Enforcement," The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , vol. 630(1), pages 294-321, July.
    8. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
    9. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "What are the consequences of an amnesty for undocumented immigrants?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    10. José Martínez, 2013. "Mexican Migrants to the United States: an Alternative Methodology," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 1-30, May.
    11. Elsner, Benjamin & Narciso, Gaia & Thijssen, Jacco J. J., 2013. "Migrant Networks and the Spread of Misinformation," IZA Discussion Papers 7863, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Benjamin Aleman-Castilla, 2007. "The Returns to Temporary Migration to the United States: Evidence from the Mexican Urban Employment Survey," CEP Discussion Papers dp0804, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Aleman-Castilla, Benjamin, 2007. "The returns to temporary migration to the United States: evidence from the Mexican urban employment survey," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19706, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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