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Karen A. Woodrow-Lafield

Personal Details

First Name:Karen
Middle Name:A.
Last Name:Woodrow-Lafield
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwo166
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://home.comcast.net/~karenwoodrowlafield

Affiliation

University of Maryland, Maryland Population Research Center (University of Maryland, Maryland Population Research Center)

http://popcenter.umd.edu
College Park

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Frank Bean & Rodolfo Corona & Rodolfo Tuiran & Karen Woodrow-Lafield & Jennifer Hook, 2001. "Circular, invisible, and ambiguous migrants: Components of difference in estimates of the number of unauthorized Mexican migrants in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(3), pages 411-422, August.

Citations

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Articles

  1. Frank Bean & Rodolfo Corona & Rodolfo Tuiran & Karen Woodrow-Lafield & Jennifer Hook, 2001. "Circular, invisible, and ambiguous migrants: Components of difference in estimates of the number of unauthorized Mexican migrants in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(3), pages 411-422, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Magnus Lofstrom & Frank Bean, 2002. "Assessing immigrant policy options: Labor market conditions and postreform declines in immigrants’ receipt of welfare," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 617-637, November.
    2. Fernando Riosmena & Douglas S. Massey, 2012. "Pathways to El Norte: Origins, Destinations, and Characteristics of Mexican Migrants to the United States," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 3-36, March.
    3. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," NBER Working Papers 12141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Pablo Ibarraran & Darren Lubotsky, 2007. "Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census," NBER Chapters,in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 159-192 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "What are the consequences of an amnesty for undocumented immigrants?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. José Martínez, 2013. "Mexican Migrants to the United States: an Alternative Methodology," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 1-30, May.
    7. Elsner, Benjamin & Narciso, Gaia & Thijssen, Jacco J. J., 2013. "Migrant Networks and the Spread of Misinformation," IZA Discussion Papers 7863, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2002. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," NBER Working Papers 9242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Jennifer Hook & Weiwei Zhang & Frank D. Bean & Jeffrey S. Passel, 2006. "Foreign-born emigration: A new approach and estimates based on matched CPS files," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 361-382, May.
    10. Benjamin Aleman-Castilla, 2007. "The Returns to Temporary Migration to the United States: Evidence from the Mexican Urban Employment Survey," CEP Discussion Papers dp0804, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    11. Aleman-Castilla, Benjamin, 2007. "The returns to temporary migration to the United States: evidence from the Mexican urban employment survey," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19706, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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