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Nutrition, lactation, and birth spacing in filipino women

Author

Listed:
  • Barry Popkin
  • David Guilkey
  • John Akin
  • Linda Adair
  • J. Richard Udry
  • Wilhelm Flieger

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Barry Popkin & David Guilkey & John Akin & Linda Adair & J. Richard Udry & Wilhelm Flieger, 1993. "Nutrition, lactation, and birth spacing in filipino women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(3), pages 333-352, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:30:y:1993:i:3:p:333-352
    DOI: 10.2307/2061644
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Willis, Robert J, 1987. "What Have We Learned from the Economics of the Family?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 68-81, May.
    2. Heckman, James J & Hotz, V Joseph & Walker, James R, 1985. "New Evidence on the Timing and Spacing of Births," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 179-184, May.
    3. Cebu Study Team, 1992. "A child health production function estimated from longitudinal data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 323-351, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Social Policy and Population Section, Social Development Division, ESCAP., 2003. "Asia-Pacific Population Journal Volume 18, No. 2," Asia-Pacific Population Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 18(2), pages 1-75, November.
    2. Colchero, M. Arantxa & Bishai, David, 2012. "Weight and earnings among childbearing women in Metropolitan Cebu, Philippines (1983–2002)," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 256-263.

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