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Long-term economic consequences for women of delayed childbearing and reduced family size


  • Sandra Hofferth


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  • Sandra Hofferth, 1984. "Long-term economic consequences for women of delayed childbearing and reduced family size," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 21(2), pages 141-155, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:21:y:1984:i:2:p:141-155
    DOI: 10.2307/2061035

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bagozzi, Richard P & Van Loo, M Frances, 1978. " Fertility as Consumption: Theories from the Behavioral Sciences," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 199-228, March.
    2. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
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    Cited by:

    1. Massimiliano Bratti & Laura Cavalli, 2014. "Delayed First Birth and New Mothers’ Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Biological Fertility Shocks," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 35-63, February.
    2. Blackburn, McKinley L & Bloom, David E & Neumark, David, 1993. "Fertility Timing, Wages, and Human Capital," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 6(1), pages 1-30.
    3. Karsten Hank & Michael Wagner, 2013. "Parenthood, Marital Status, and Well-Being in Later Life: Evidence from SHARE," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(2), pages 639-653, November.
    4. Sara Cools & Marte Strøm, 2016. "Parenthood wage penalties in a double income society," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 391-416, June.
    5. Jeremy R. Porter, 2012. "Cultural vs. Economic: Re-Visiting the Determinants of Fertility at a Sub-National Level in the U.S, 1990 - 2000," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 2(6), pages 91-108, November.
    6. Luis Fernando Gamboa & José Alberto Guerra, 2006. "Una evaluación estática y dinámica de los cambios en calidad de vida en Colombia durante 1997-2003," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, December.

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