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Education and the location of work: a continued economic role for central cities?

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  • William Sander

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  • William Testa

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Abstract

Using data on individuals from the 2008 American Community Survey, we examine the relationship between educational attainment and the location of jobs in fifteen large metropolitan areas in the United States. We focus on whether individuals with higher educational attainment tend to work in the central city versus the suburbs, and we do so taking into account the residential location of households (central city vs suburb). We show that central cities tend to be the work site of more highly educated workers—those with a bachelor’s degree and above. Workers with less than a high school degree also tend to work in the city. Taking account of the residential location preferences of highly educated workers mildly diminishes the direct effect of higher education on city job location, but it does not negate it. In contrast, central city job opportunities for workers with less than a high school education are not so abundant; these workers tend to work in the city mostly because they also live there. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

Suggested Citation

  • William Sander & William Testa, 2013. "Education and the location of work: a continued economic role for central cities?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(2), pages 577-590, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:50:y:2013:i:2:p:577-590
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-012-0506-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alex Anas & Richard Arnott & Kenneth A. Small, 1998. "Urban Spatial Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1426-1464, September.
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    4. Patrick Bajari & Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "Estimating Housing Demand With an Application to Explaining Racial Segregation in Cities," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 20-33, January.
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    6. Ono, Yukako, 2003. "Outsourcing business services and the role of central administrative offices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 377-395, May.
    7. William Sander & William A. Testa, 2009. "Education and Household Location in Chicago," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(1), pages 116-139, March.
    8. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E. & Rappaport, Jordan, 2008. "Why do the poor live in cities The role of public transportation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. William Sander & William Testa, 2015. "Parents' education, school-age children and household location in American cities," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(3), pages 573-595, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Location; Work; Cities; D19; I20; R12;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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