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Future Productivity Growth in Canada: The Role of the Service Sector


  • Benoit Robidoux



In the third and final article in the Symposium included in this volume on Future Productivity Growth in Canada, Benoît Robidoux from Finance Canada observes that there has been a structural improvement in labour productivity growth in Canada since 1996 and that it is likely that this stronger productivity growth of around 2 per cent per year will continue. He points out that future productivity growth in Canada will increasingly depend on productivity trends in the expanding service sector, and in particular on the ability of this sector to incorporate information and communication technologies into the production process.

Suggested Citation

  • Benoit Robidoux, 2003. "Future Productivity Growth in Canada: The Role of the Service Sector," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 7, pages 58-65, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:7:y:2003:7

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The Case of the Missing Productivity Growth: Or, Does Information Technology Explain why Productivity Accelerated in the US but not the UK?," NBER Working Papers 10010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. MartinNeil Baily & Robert Z. Lawrence, 2001. "Do We Have a New E-conomy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 308-312, May.
    3. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
    4. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The case of the missing productivity growth: or, does information technology explain why productivity accelerated in the United States but not the United Kingdom?," Working Paper Series WP-03-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas A. Wilson, 2003. "A Perspective on Future Productivity Growth in Canada," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 7, pages 46-49, Fall.
    2. Don Drummond & Evan Capeluck & Matthew Calver, 2015. "The Key Challenge for Canadian Public Policy: Generating Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth," CSLS Research Reports 2015-11, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    3. Jeremy Smith, 2004. "Aggregate Labour Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States: Definitions, Trends and Measurement Issues," CSLS Research Reports 2004-04, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    4. Ayhan Kose & Roberto Cardarelli, 2004. "Economic Integration, Business Cycle, and Productivity in North America," IMF Working Papers 04/138, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item


    Information; Communication; Technology; Service Sector; Growth Accounting; Canada; Labour Productivity Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • E66 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General Outlook and Conditions
    • L80 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - General


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