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An Application of a Stated Preference Method to Value Urban Amenities

Listed author(s):
  • Peter Howie

    (Department of Policy Studies, Mount Royal University, 4825 Mount Royal Gate SW, Calgary, Alberta, T3E 6K6, Canada, phowie@mtroyal.ca)

  • Sean M. Murphy

    (Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, Texas, 79016, USA, smurphy@wtamu.edu)

  • John Wicks

    (Department of Economics, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, 59812, USA, john.wicks@mso.umt.edu)

Registered author(s):

    This is a case study analysis of how residents value the amenities of a small US city—Missoula, Montana. A measure of a community’s amenity values is needed in city planning so as to protect those elements of urban communities that are highly valued. Missoulians favoured their local amenities against an average of 30 comparison cities. Results from this study’s stated preference model indicate that Missoulians highly value amenities such as outdoor recreation, low population density and scenery; whereas, they are generally willing to tolerate less than average levels of job opportunities. The study’s results raise questions about the appropriate methods for local governments to pursue when attempting to raise wage rates by ‘growing the economy’ of a city like Missoula.

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    File URL: http://usj.sagepub.com/content/47/2/235.abstract
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    Article provided by Urban Studies Journal Limited in its journal Urban Studies.

    Volume (Year): 47 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 235-256

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    Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:47:y:2010:i:2:p:235-256
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/urbanstudiesjournal

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