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Is Job Stability Declining in the U.S. Economy?

Author

Listed:
  • Kenneth A. Swinnerton
  • Howard Wial

Abstract

Using Current Population Survey data, the authors examine changes in job stability during the 1980s. For consecutive four-year periods during 1979–91, they present estimates of four-year retention rates for workers with varying levels of employer-specific seniority. Retention rates of low-seniority workers rose between 1979–83 and 1983–87 but fell between 1983–87 and 1987–91. Retention rates for 1987–91 were typically lower than those for 1979–83, suggesting a secular decline in job stability during the 1980s.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth A. Swinnerton & Howard Wial, 1995. "Is Job Stability Declining in the U.S. Economy?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(2), pages 293-304, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:48:y:1995:i:2:p:293-304
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    Cited by:

    1. Diebold, Francis X & Neumark, David & Polsky, Daniel, 1997. "Job Stability in the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 206-233, April.
    2. Peter Cappelli, 1995. "Rethinking Employment," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 33(4), pages 563-602, December.
    3. Brochu, Pierre, 2011. "Estimating labour market transitions and continuations using repeated cross sectional data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 84-87, April.
    4. Marianne Bertrand, 2004. "From the Invisible Handshake to the Invisible Hand? How Import Competition Changes the Employment Relationship," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(4), pages 723-766, October.
    5. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pb:p:2439-2483 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kandel, Eugene & Pearson, Neil D., 2001. "Flexibility versus Commitment in Personnel Management," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 515-556, December.
    7. Cynthia Bansak & Steven Raphael, 2006. "Have Employment Relationships in the United States Become Less Stable?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 12(3), pages 342-357, August.
    8. Rainer Winkelmann & Klaus Zimmermann, 1998. "Is job stability declining in Germany? Evidence from count data models," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(11), pages 1413-1420.
    9. Marcel Erlinghagen, 2006. "Job Stability, Mobility and Labour Market Restructuring. Evidence from German Microdata," management revue - Socio-Economic Studies, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 17(4), pages 372-394.
    10. Alec R. Levenson, 1996. "Recent Trends In Part‐Time Employment," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(4), pages 78-89, October.
    11. Justina A. V. Fischer & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2008. "Personality, Job Satisfaction and Health - The Mediating Influence of Affectivity," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 144(III), pages 379-435, September.

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