IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/ecdequ/v25y2011i4p303-315.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Supply or Demand, Make or Buy

Author

Listed:
  • Paul D. Gottlieb

    (Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA)

Abstract

This article lays out two broad criteria for crafting a particular brain drain policy at the state level. The first, which we are calling “supply or demand,†asks whether a state experiencing brain drain is below average in high-tech labor demand or above average in high-tech labor supply (the latter concept measured by university enrollments). It is argued that the answer to this question matters a great deal to the policy response. The article then proposes a second, related framework for crafting brain drain policies, which is used widely in the world of business. This is whether a state should “make†or “buy†its own high-tech workers. Benchmarking data and a new review of state policy programs are then used to compare what states are doing with what they ought to be doing in light of their particular situations.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul D. Gottlieb, 2011. "Supply or Demand, Make or Buy," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 25(4), pages 303-315, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:25:y:2011:i:4:p:303-315
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://edq.sagepub.com/content/25/4/303.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dynarski, Susan, 2000. "Hope for Whom? Financial Aid for the Middle Class and Its Impact on College Attendance," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 53(3), pages 629-662, September.
    2. Kate Bishop & Toke Reichstein & Ammon Salter, 2008. "Exploring the Role of Geographic Proximity in Shaping University–Industry Interaction," Chapters,in: Creating Wealth from Knowledge, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Peter Lindelöf & Hans Löfsten, 2004. "Proximity as a Resource Base for Competitive Advantage: University--Industry Links for Technology Transfer," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 29(3_4), pages 311-326, August.
    4. Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, 2001. "Migration of recent college graduates: evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 13-34.
    5. Gerke Hoogstra & Jouke Van Dijk & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2005. "Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino-Mills studies," ERSA conference papers ersa05p737, European Regional Science Association.
    6. (ed.), 1992. "Index," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1241.
    7. Iryna Lendel, 2010. "The Impact of Research Universities on Regional Economies: The Concept of University Products," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 24(3), pages 210-230, August.
    8. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "The waxing and waning of regional economies: the chicken-egg question of jobs versus people," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 76-97, January.
    9. Richard Florida & Charlotta Mellander & Kevin Stolarick, 2008. "Inside the black box of regional development: human capital, the creative class and tolerance," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(5), pages 615-649, September.
    10. Elizabeth Currid & Kevin Stolarick, 2010. "The Occupation—Industry Mismatch: New Trajectories for Regional Cluster Analysis and Economic Development," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(2), pages 337-362, February.
    11. Edward W. (Ned) Hill & Iryna Lendel, 2007. "The Impact of the Reputation of Bio-Life Science and Engineering Doctoral Programs on Regional Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 21(3), pages 223-243, August.
    12. Ann Markusen & Gregory H. Wassall & Douglas DeNatale & Randy Cohen, 2008. "Defining the Creative Economy: Industry and Occupational Approaches," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 22(1), pages 24-45, February.
    13. Paul D. Gottlieb & George Joseph, 2006. "College-To-Work Migration Of Technology Graduates And Holders Of Doctorates Within The United States," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 627-659.
    14. John Deskins & Brian Hill & Laura Ullrich, 2010. "Education Spending and State Economic Growth: Are All Dollars Created Equal?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 24(1), pages 45-59, February.
    15. Bound, John & Groen, Jeffrey & Kezdi, G.Gabor & Turner, Sarah, 2004. "Trade in university training: cross-state variation in the production and stock of college-educated labor," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 143-173.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:25:y:2011:i:4:p:303-315. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.