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Migration of recent college graduates: evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth

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  • Yolanda K. Kodrzycki

Abstract

In the context of today's tight labor markets, as well as projections of continued demand for workers with high skills, various states are considering how to retain and attract college graduates. Such efforts involve identifying an area's relative strengths and weaknesses and taking actions as needed, either to capitalize on the strengths or to mitigate the weaknesses. Perhaps surprisingly, however, little systematic evidence exists on the factors influencing location decisions of recent graduates. This study is a first step in providing such evidence, making use of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth from 1979 to 1996 to examine cross-state migration in the five-year period after completion of schooling. ; The author first presents information on geographic mobility of young adults by educational attainment and region of the country. Next, she briefly outlines previous explanations for migration in the general population and investigates their applicability both to young college graduates and-for comparison-to other young adults without four years of college. Her study shows that the person's past history of migration is very important. In addition, the majority of moves are made to states with stronger economies or more attractive characteristics, as measured by such factors as higher employment growth, lower unemployment, higher pay, lower housing costs, or better amenities.

Suggested Citation

  • Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, 2001. "Migration of recent college graduates: evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 13-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:2001:p:13-34:n:1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Greenwood, Michael J, et al, 1991. "Migration, Regional Equilibrium, and the Estimation of Compensating Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1382-1390, December.
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    3. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
    4. Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, 1999. "Geographic shifts in higher education," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jul, pages 27-47.
    5. Randall W. Eberts & Joe A. Stone, 1992. "Wage and Employment Adjustment in Local Labor Markets," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wea, November.
    6. Pissarides, Christopher A & McMaster, Ian, 1990. "Regional Migration, Wages and Unemployment: Empirical Evidence and Implications for Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(4), pages 812-831, October.
    7. Greenwood, Michael J. & Hunt, Gary L., 1989. "Jobs versus amenities in the analysis of metropolitan migration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 1-16, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Parey & Fabian Waldinger, 2011. "Studying Abroad and the Effect on International Labour Market Mobility: Evidence from the Introduction of ERASMUS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 194-222, March.
    2. Ann Marie Fiore & Linda S. Niehm & Jessica L. Hurst & Jihyeong Son & Amrut Sadachar & Daniel W. Russell & David Swenson & Christopher Seeger, 2015. "Will They Stay or Will They Go? Community Features Important in Migration Decisions of Recent University Graduates," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 29(1), pages 23-37, February.
    3. Hawley, Zackary B. & Rork, Jonathan C., 2013. "The case of state funded higher education scholarship plans and interstate brain drain," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 242-249.
    4. Joy, Lois, 2006. "Occupational differences between recent male and female college graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 221-231, April.
    5. Patricio Aroca & Juan Pedro Eberhard, 2015. "Human Capital Concentration and the Place-Based Policies in Chile," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1496, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Michelle Miller-Adams & Bridget Timmeney, 2013. "The Impact of the Kalamazoo Promise on College Choice: An Analysis of Kalamazoo Area Math and Science Center Graduates," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 2013-014, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    7. Paul D. Gottlieb, 2011. "Supply or Demand, Make or Buy," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 25(4), pages 303-315, November.
    8. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:8:p:1490-1504 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0765-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Carree, Martin & Kronenberg, Kristin, 2012. "Locational choices and the costs of distance: empirical evidence for Dutch graduates," MPRA Paper 36221, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0749-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Oliver Busch, 2007. "Wie groß ist der Brain Drain innerhalb von Deutschland?," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(04), pages 48-51, 08.
    13. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-015-0728-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Stephen Malpezzi, 2001. "NIMBYs and Knowledge: Urban Regulation and the "New Economy"," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 01-4, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    15. Ronald L. Whisler & Brigitte S. Waldorf & Gordon F. Mulligan & David A. Plane, 2008. "Quality of Life and the Migration of the College-Educated: A Life-Course Approach," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 58-94.
    16. repec:ces:ifodre:v:14:y:2007:i:04:p:s.48-51 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Maria Abreu & Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann, 2011. "Migration and inter-industry mobility of UK graduates: Effect on earnings and career satisfaction," ERSA conference papers ersa11p118, European Regional Science Association.
    18. Peter McHenry, 2014. "The Geographic Distribution Of Human Capital: Measurement Of Contributing Mechanisms," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 215-248, March.
    19. Brahim Boudarbat & Marie Connolly, 2013. "Exode des cerveaux : Pourquoi certains diplômés d'études postsecondaires choisissent-ils de travailler aux États-Unis?," CIRANO Project Reports 2013rp-13, CIRANO.
    20. Herbst, Mikolaj & Kaczmarczyk, Pawel & Wojcik, Piotr, 2014. "Migration of Graduates within a Sequential Decision Framework: Evidence from Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 8573, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    21. Felicia Ionescu & Linnea A. Polgreen, 2009. "A Theory of Brain Drain and Public Funding for Higher Education in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 517-521, May.
    22. Larsson, Johan P & Wennberg, Karl & Wiklund, Johan & Wright, Mike, 2017. "Location Choices of Graduate Entrepreneurs," Ratio Working Papers 290, The Ratio Institute.

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    Keywords

    Education ; Labor market ; Migration; Internal;

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