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Bargaining, War, and Alliances

Author

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  • R. Harrison Wagner

    (Department of Government University of Texas Austin, Texas, USA, rhwagner@mail.utexas.edu)

Abstract

As a way of clarifying and evaluating competing claims made by writers on alliances and the balance of power, I extend recent work on the relation between bargaining and war to a three-state setting where coalitions are possible. I show that if what is commonly called “balancing†occurs at all, it is because it is seen as a way of reducing the risk associated with possible exogenous changes in the distribution of military capabilities. It is therefore not necessarily inconsistent with what is called “bandwagoning,†but can actually make bandwagoning more likely. Moreover, balancing need not occur for international systems to be stable.

Suggested Citation

  • R. Harrison Wagner, 2004. "Bargaining, War, and Alliances," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 21(3), pages 215-231, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:21:y:2004:i:3:p:215-231
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    File URL: http://cmp.sagepub.com/content/21/3/215.abstract
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    Cited by:

    1. Konrad, Kai A. & Cusack, Thomas R., 2013. "Hanging together or being hung separately: The strategic power of coalitions where bargaining occurs with incomplete information," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Behavior SP II 2013-202, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. L. Lambertini, 2006. "Is America Unrivaled? A Repeated Game Analysis," Working Papers 563, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    3. Chyanda Querido, 2009. "State-Sponsored Mass Killing in African Wars—Greed or Grievance?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 15(3), pages 351-361, August.

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