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Presidential Address: Industry Location, Economic Development Incentives, and Clusters

Listed author(s):
  • Woodward, Douglas P.

    (South Carolina State University)

In his Presidential Address, Professor Woodward uses South Carolina’s economic development experience as a case study of significant challenges in regional development. The state has re-industrialized and emerged as a leader in attracting capital investment through generous financial incentives, after watching the demise of its major industry cluster (textiles and apparel) since the 1970s. The address argues that regional science research continues to advance our understanding of regional policies promoting industrial location. He urges caution regarding development incentives as a regional strategy. Instead, emerging research suggests that stronger agglomeration and cluster-based strategies are better suited to promote contemporary economic development.

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File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/42.1.2/pdf
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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 42 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (Spring)
Pages: 5-23

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:42:y:2012:i:1:p:5-23
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.srsa.org

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  1. Barkley, David L., 2008. "Evaluations of Regional Competitiveness: Making a Case for Case Studies," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 38(2), pages 121-143.
  2. Bartik, Timothy J, 1985. "Business Location Decisions in the United States: Estimates of the Effects of Unionization, Taxes, and Other Characteristics of States," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 3(1), pages 14-22, January.
  3. Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod & Daniel Liviano-Solis & Miguel Manjón-Antolín, 2010. "Empirical Studies In Industrial Location: An Assessment Of Their Methods And Results," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(3), pages 685-711.
  4. Gilles Duranton & Henry G. Overman, 2005. "Testing for Localization Using Micro-Geographic Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 1077-1106.
  5. Chirinko, Robert S. & Wilson, Daniel J., 2008. "State investment tax incentives: A zero-sum game?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(12), pages 2362-2384, December.
  6. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
  7. Coughlin, Cletus C & Terza, Joseph V & Arromdee, Vachira, 1991. "State Characteristics and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment within the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 675-683, November.
  8. Edward M. Bergman & Edward J. Feser, . "Industrial and regional Clusters: Concepts and Comparative Applications," Wholbk, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University, number 19 edited by Randall Jackson, June.
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