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Learning to Be Different: Quantitative Research in Economics and Political Science

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  • Alexander Libman

    () (Frankfurt School of Finance and Management)

Abstract

The comment addresses the subtle differences that exist between economics and political science in terms of how the standards for the empirical quantitative research are set. It shows that the common methodology is applied by the disciplines in a different fashion. These differences could become obstacles for communication, but could also provide fruitful background for discussion of disciplines, if one explicitly takes them into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Libman, 2012. "Learning to Be Different: Quantitative Research in Economics and Political Science," Rationality, Markets and Morals, Frankfurt School Verlag, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, vol. 3(62), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:rmm:journl:v:3:y:2012:i:62
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    File URL: http://www.rmm-journal.de/downloads/Comment_on_Madrigal.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Gerard Roland, 2017. "Culture, Institutions, and the Wealth of Nations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(3), pages 402-416, July.
    9. David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2012. "Propaganda and Conflict: Theory and Evidence from the Rwandan Genocide," CID Working Papers 257, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    10. Banerjee, Abhijit & Chattopadhyay, Raghabendra & Duflo, Esther & Keniston, Daniel & Singh, Nina, 2012. "Can Institutions Be Reformed from Within? Evidence from a Randomized Experiment with the Rajasthan Police," CEPR Discussion Papers 8869, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Fuchs-Schundeln, Nicola & Alesina, Alberto, 2007. "Good-Bye Lenin (Or Not?): The Effect of Communism on People's Preferences," Scholarly Articles 4553032, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    12. Kern, Holger & Hainmueller, Jens, 2007. "Opium for the Masses: How Foreign Free Media Can Stabilize Authoritarian Regimes," MPRA Paper 2702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Libman, A., 2013. "Between New Political Economy and Political Science: Convergence and Divergence of Disciplines," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 166-169.

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