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Effectiveness of Capital Controls: Evidence from Thailand




This paper examines the effectiveness of capital account policies in Thailand during the period 1993–2010. Our results show that policies toward capital account liberalization tend to be more effective than those toward capital account restriction in changing the volume of capital flows. The composition of capital flows also matters for the effectiveness of policy measures. When capital restrictions were introduced in the late 2000s, our results show that there was a switching effect from more capital restricted asset classes toward less restricted ones. This study also finds that the central bank did not gain more monetary autonomy from introducing capital inflow restrictions. However, such restrictions, both inflows and outflows liability side), could help limit the fluctuations in the nominal exchange rate, especially relative to the US dollar in 2000–2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Jongwanich, Juthathip & Kohpaiboon, Archanun, 2012. "Effectiveness of Capital Controls: Evidence from Thailand," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 29(2), pages 50-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbadr:2746

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bruno Coelho & Kevin Gallagher, 2010. "Capital Controls and 21st Century Financial Crises: Evidence from Colombia and Thailand," Working Papers wp213, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Edison, Hali & Reinhart, Carmen M., 2001. "Stopping hot money," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 533-553, December.
    3. Nicolas Magud & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2007. "Capital Controls: An Evaluation," NBER Chapters,in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 645-674 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Edwards, Sebastian, 2007. "Capital controls, capital flow contractions, and macroeconomic vulnerability," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 814-840, September.
    5. Akira Ariyoshi & Andrei A Kirilenko & Inci Ötker & Bernard J Laurens & Jorge I Canales Kriljenko & Karl F Habermeier, 2000. "Capital Controls; Country Experiences with Their Use and Liberalization," IMF Occasional Papers 190, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Sebastian Edwards, 1999. "How Effective Are Capital Controls?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 65-84, Fall.
    7. Nicolas Magud & Carmen Reinhart & Kenneth Rogoff, 2005. "Capital Controls: Myth and Reality A Portfolio Balance Approach to Capital Controls," University of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers 2006-10, University of Oregon Economics Department.
    8. Christopher J. Neely, 1999. "An introduction to capital controls," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 13-30.
    9. Mody, Ashoka & Murshid, Antu Panini, 2005. "Growing up with capital flows," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 249-266, January.
    10. Maria Socorro Gochoco-Bautista & Juthathip Jongwanich & Jong-Wha Lee, 2012. "How Effective Are Capital Controls in Asia?," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 11(2), pages 122-143, Summer.
    11. Martin Schindler, 2009. "Measuring Financial Integration: A New Data Set," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(1), pages 222-238, April.
    12. Natalia T. Tamirisa, 1999. "Exchange and Capital Controls as Barriers to Trade," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 46(1), pages 1-4.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sen Gupta, Abhijit & Sengupta, Rajeswari, 2014. "Capital Flows and Capital Account Management in Selected Asian Economies," MPRA Paper 80330, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2016.
    2. Gochoco-Bautista, Maria Socorro & Remolona, Eli M., 2012. "Going Regional: How to Deepen ASEAN's Financial Markets," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 300, Asian Development Bank.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets


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