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Finite Horizons, Political Economy, and Growth

Author

Listed:
  • James A Kahn

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Jong-Soo Lim

    (Kwangwoon University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the political economy of growth when agents and the government have finite horizons and equilibrium growth is inefficient. A "representative" government (i.e. one whose preferences reflect those of its constituents) endowed merely with the ability to tax and transfer can improve somewhat on the market allocation, but cannot achieve first-best growth. Efficiency requires in addition the ability to bind future governments. We argue that this ability is related to political stability, and provide empirical evidence that stability and growth-related policies (namely education) are meaningfully related. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • James A Kahn & Jong-Soo Lim, 2001. "Finite Horizons, Political Economy, and Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 1-25, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:4:y:2001:i:1:p:1-25
    DOI: 10.1006/redy.2000.0111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kahn, J.A., 1996. "Education, Political Instability, and Growth," RCER Working Papers 434, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    2. Murard, Elie, 2017. "Less Welfare or Fewer Foreigners? Immigrant Inflows and Public Opinion towards Redistribution and Migration Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 10805, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    growth; political instability; political economy; education; Markov equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies

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