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Implications of regulating commodity derivatives markets in the USA and EU


  • Jayati Ghosh

    () (Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.)


The argument for effective financial regulation to curb financial activity and associated volatility in primary commodity markets is now more compelling than ever, in the context of the renewed increase in food prices. However, as in much other financial regulation, the devil is in the detail. This paper considers recent patterns in global food markets and discusses some of the implications of recent moves to regulate financial activity in commodity futures markets in the US and the EU. Specific regulatory issues are considered and alternative strategies are considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayati Ghosh, 2011. "Implications of regulating commodity derivatives markets in the USA and EU," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 64(258), pages 287-304.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:pslqrr:2011:36

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christopher L. Gilbert, 2010. "How to Understand High Food Prices," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 398-425.
    2. Baffes, John & Haniotis, Tassos, 2010. "Placing the 2006/08 commodity price boom into perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5371, The World Bank.
    3. Christopher L. Gilbert, 2010. "Speculative Influences On Commodity Futures Prices 2006-2008," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 197, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    4. Hernandez, Manuel & Torero, Maximo, 2010. "Examining the dynamic relationship between spot and future prices of agricultural commodities," IFPRI discussion papers 988, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Roncaglia, 2011. "Introduction," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 64(258), pages 189-191.

    More about this item


    Finance; Commodities; Food;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative


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